FastCompany Magazine

The official Tumblr of Fast Company.

npr:

Why Aren’t More Girls Attracted To Physics?

You don’t need to be a social scientist to know there is a gender diversity problem in technology. The tech industry in Silicon Valleyand across the nation is overwhelmingly male-dominated.
That isn’t to say there aren’t women working at tech firms.Marissa Mayer, the CEO of Yahoo! andSheryl Sandbergof Facebook have raised the profile of women at high tech firms. But those prominent exceptions do not accurately portray who makes up theengineeringranks at those and other tech companies.

Read the rest and listen to the story on Morning Edition.
(Photo: iStockPhoto)

npr:

Why Aren’t More Girls Attracted To Physics?

You don’t need to be a social scientist to know there is a gender diversity problem in technology. The tech industry in Silicon Valleyand across the nation is overwhelmingly male-dominated.

That isn’t to say there aren’t women working at tech firms.Marissa Mayer, the CEO of Yahoo! andSheryl Sandbergof Facebook have raised the profile of women at high tech firms. But those prominent exceptions do not accurately portray who makes up theengineeringranks at those and other tech companies.

Read the rest and listen to the story on Morning Edition.

(Photo: iStockPhoto)

Instead Of Taking Your Daughters To Work, Introduce Them To Technology
Today marks the 20th anniversary of Take Our Daughters and Sons to Work Day. No doubt, it is a fantastic initiative. However, in 2013 many freelancers and entrepreneurs work from home. And many employees don’t work in offices anymore.
For workers who remain in office environments, it seems that exposing our kids to the drudgery of cubicles, mind-numbing meetings, and dull cafeteria food is not very inspiring.
Besides, many coveted tech jobs that exist today—for example, in social media—weren’t even conceived of a decade ago. Our kids won’t be doing same jobs anyway.
Although future jobs will continue to change, one thing is for sure: Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) will be pervasive in everything we do.
So rather than going to work, why don’t you set aside a day and take your daughter to tech? Here are a few ideas to swap for hauling your kids to your desk:
Learn about women in tech and science: WITI (Women in Technology International) is sponsoring a social media scavenger hunt for high school girls to learn about female role models. In this contest, girls can name their favorite role model, grab fun badges such as “I’m a WITI girl” (love the pun), and create Pinterest boards with their favorite women in tech and science. Winners will get free tickets to meet inspirational women in tech and science at the annual WITI Hall of Fame Ceremony in June and other prizes.
Visit a tech or science museum: If you’re in the Bay area, the Exploratorium in San Francisco just re-opened on Pier 15 with 150 new exhibits.
Join the Worldwide #WITI Wave celebration: Let’s show our kids that women work in tech and science careers around the world by posting your video to the WITI Wavepage or tweeting your support for women in tech at #WITIWave.
Read about important women in STEM careers at the 2013 Women’s History Month website. STEM is the focus in 2013.
Sign your kids up for a technology or science summer camp such as iD Tech Campsheld at many U.S. universities.
Set aside time to help them participate in science events such as Google’s Science Fair.
Let’s share technology and science careers with our daughters and sons and let them experience the possibilities before it’s too late.
[Image: Flickr user D. Sharon Pruitt]

Instead Of Taking Your Daughters To Work, Introduce Them To Technology

Today marks the 20th anniversary of Take Our Daughters and Sons to Work Day. No doubt, it is a fantastic initiative. However, in 2013 many freelancers and entrepreneurs work from home. And many employees don’t work in offices anymore.

For workers who remain in office environments, it seems that exposing our kids to the drudgery of cubicles, mind-numbing meetings, and dull cafeteria food is not very inspiring.

Besides, many coveted tech jobs that exist today—for example, in social media—weren’t even conceived of a decade ago. Our kids won’t be doing same jobs anyway.

Although future jobs will continue to change, one thing is for sure: Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) will be pervasive in everything we do.

So rather than going to work, why don’t you set aside a day and take your daughter to tech? Here are a few ideas to swap for hauling your kids to your desk:

Learn about women in tech and science: WITI (Women in Technology International) is sponsoring a social media scavenger hunt for high school girls to learn about female role models. In this contest, girls can name their favorite role model, grab fun badges such as “I’m a WITI girl” (love the pun), and create Pinterest boards with their favorite women in tech and science. Winners will get free tickets to meet inspirational women in tech and science at the annual WITI Hall of Fame Ceremony in June and other prizes.

Visit a tech or science museum: If you’re in the Bay area, the Exploratorium in San Francisco just re-opened on Pier 15 with 150 new exhibits.

Join the Worldwide #WITI Wave celebration: Let’s show our kids that women work in tech and science careers around the world by posting your video to the WITI Wavepage or tweeting your support for women in tech at #WITIWave.

Read about important women in STEM careers at the 2013 Women’s History Month websiteSTEM is the focus in 2013.

Sign your kids up for a technology or science summer camp such as iD Tech Campsheld at many U.S. universities.

Set aside time to help them participate in science events such as Google’s Science Fair.

Let’s share technology and science careers with our daughters and sons and let them experience the possibilities before it’s too late.

[Image: Flickr user D. Sharon Pruitt]