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The Next Big UI Idea: Gadgets That Adapt To Your Skill

More and more interactive products are being returned. In 2002, 48% of all returned products were technically fully functional but were rejected for failing to satisfy user needs (28%) or purely due to users’ remorse (20%). Even though a product may have all the features one can hope for, complexity and bad user experience can prevent users from integrating it into their lives.

User experiences are subjective and dynamic, but by and large, interactive products are not designed to take people’s changing capacity and experience into account. But they could.

Here, I present a model for how designers can use the fundamentals of video games and the psychological principles of flow to design enhanced user experiences.

As gadgets get more complicated, user interfaces must be able to teach their users over time.

Here is how Philip Battin thinks this can happen.

 

Even when it comes to the most sophisticated forms of technology, personality, behavior, and emotions often have more of an impact on a user than screen-based interactions. Body language is tremendously compelling; we pick up on it faster and trust it more implicitly than any other language. In one of my current projects, a robot that interacts intensively with people, our team has come to understand that people’s ability to read the status and intent of the robot at a distance and on the fly is far more important than the screen-focused interactions that the technology supports.
What A Toaster Teaches You About The Future Of User Interfaces

Even when it comes to the most sophisticated forms of technology, personality, behavior, and emotions often have more of an impact on a user than screen-based interactions. Body language is tremendously compelling; we pick up on it faster and trust it more implicitly than any other language. In one of my current projects, a robot that interacts intensively with people, our team has come to understand that people’s ability to read the status and intent of the robot at a distance and on the fly is far more important than the screen-focused interactions that the technology supports.

What A Toaster Teaches You About The Future Of User Interfaces

I’m sure there are more than 5. What else would you put on this list?
5 Ways Your Crappy Co-Worker Is Like A Crappy UI

4. ALWAYS DEDICATING RESOURCES TO THE WRONG THINGS
When a project needed to be done, this woman would be fiddling in the margins, adjusting fonts on a PowerPoint. And when a project needed to be fixed, she never knew what to prioritize. “Oh is this important? I had no idea!”

I’m sure there are more than 5. What else would you put on this list?

5 Ways Your Crappy Co-Worker Is Like A Crappy UI

4. ALWAYS DEDICATING RESOURCES TO THE WRONG THINGS

When a project needed to be done, this woman would be fiddling in the margins, adjusting fonts on a PowerPoint. And when a project needed to be fixed, she never knew what to prioritize. “Oh is this important? I had no idea!”