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"The afternoon lazed along, and when I checked my phone at 5 p.m., I was shocked to find its battery life at a historical high-for-that-time-of-day 50%. My detox was saving battery life (!) which was saving energy (!) which was saving the earth!"
Thurston took a 25 day break from the Internet. You should, too. Here’s a printable guide to unplugging, which you can refer to when you feel the urge to reach for your phone. 

"The afternoon lazed along, and when I checked my phone at 5 p.m., I was shocked to find its battery life at a historical high-for-that-time-of-day 50%. My detox was saving battery life (!) which was saving energy (!) which was saving the earth!"

Thurston took a 25 day break from the Internet. You should, too. Here’s a printable guide to unplugging, which you can refer to when you feel the urge to reach for your phone. 

I am here” day is a time to “set aside our technology and to-do lists, choose a quarter of the city we wanted to know better, and explore it for a full day… . [It is] a kind of antimodern communal experiment: giving our gadgets a secular Sabbath; reveling in friendship and conversation of a kind that Facebook doesn’t do; being thickly in one place, not thinly everywhere.

Baratunde Thurston on the perks of taking a digital hiatus.

At the bar, my recently rediscovered heads-up
display—aka my eyes—revealed a person next to me, and for several hours I found myself in a fascinating conversation with one of the dancers from the Broadway musical Spider-Man.

Baratunde Thurston, arguably one of the most connected celebrities there are, took 25 days away from the Internet. Here’s what he learned. 
As part of our #Unplug series we asked, “What do you miss (if anything) about life before the digital age?” Here are some of our favorite responses:
"The art of conversation, mystique and actually getting to know a person at a natural rate than via online presence… and of course privacy…” —Bree Williams 
"Peacefulness and serenity." —Henry Johns
"The happy ignorance of not knowing how genuinely crazy some of my friends and family are.” —Todd Wilson
"People actually having to work to stalk you." —Daisuke Iwamura
"Wonder. Before the Internet you would wonder about everything. Now you can just look it up." —Matthew Green 
Here, a few more things we miss about life before the digital age

As part of our #Unplug series we asked, “What do you miss (if anything) about life before the digital age?” Here are some of our favorite responses:

  • "The art of conversation, mystique and actually getting to know a person at a natural rate than via online presence… and of course privacy…” —Bree Williams 
  • "Peacefulness and serenity."Henry Johns
  • "The happy ignorance of not knowing how genuinely crazy some of my friends and family are.” —Todd Wilson
  • "People actually having to work to stalk you." —Daisuke Iwamura
  • "Wonder. Before the Internet you would wonder about everything. Now you can just look it up." —Matthew Green 

Here, a few more things we miss about life before the digital age

Here are four things that Baratunde Thurston realized during his 25-day hiatus from the internet:

1. I had become obsessed with The Information. 
2. I shared too much. 
3. I was addicted to myself. 
4. I forsook the benefits of the Industrial Age.

"The greatest gift I gave myself was a restored appreciation for disengagement, silence, and emptiness. I don’t need to fill every time slot with an appointment, and I don’t need to fill every mental opening with stimulus."

Here are four things that Baratunde Thurston realized during his 25-day hiatus from the internet:

1. I had become obsessed with The Information.

2. I shared too much.

3. I was addicted to myself.

4. I forsook the benefits of the Industrial Age.

"The greatest gift I gave myself was a restored appreciation for disengagement, silence, and emptiness. I don’t need to fill every time slot with an appointment, and I don’t need to fill every mental opening with stimulus."

It was like, oh my god, I can be so much more productive if I actually let my brain have a little downtime. When I get up in the morning I’m very sharp now. I can do things much faster. I’m much more focused. I feel much fresher. I feel like I used to feel before the Internet was popular.

-Kord Campbell, who recently participated in a digital detox hosted by Camp Grounded. We’ve collected stories from people who regularly unplug from their devices.

Here are the lessons they’re learning.

A Printable Guide To Unplugging

So you need to #unplug. You’re feeling overwhelmed by your gadgets—connected to your email list but not to your personal life. It’s time to take a break. It is precisely for times like these that we’ve created a guide to unplugging.

These step-by-step instructions will walk you through the difficult (but rewarding!) process of unplugging, from deciding when to unplug to informing your friends and coworkers that you’ll be offline for a while to avoiding the biggest temptations to plug back in. Here you’ll find advice from digital detoxing experts, business leaders, and our readers, whom we asked to use the #unplug hashtag to submit their best methods for logging off.

We encourage you to print these pages, and when you find yourself reaching for your phone, reach for this guide instead for tips on how to overcome the urge to use your devices. And when you’re ready to rejoin the digital world, come to FastCompany.com, and we’ll help you find the most seamless way to do so.

Let the detoxing begin!

What (if anything) do you miss the most about life before the digital age?

"Face to face conversations. Children playing outside." -Richard Saling

"I miss actual phone conversations. People only want to Facebook and text! No one wants to have phone conversations anyone it seems.” -Angel Spikes

"QUIET movie theatre experiences….and yes…vinyl records (which I still collect)." -Greg Hale

"Seclusion" -Brian Tromburg

Wonder. Before the Internet you would wonder about everything. Now you can just look it up. -Matthew Green

"The happy ignorance of not knowing how genuinely crazy some of my friends and family are." -Todd Wilson

More of what our readers miss from before the digital age

I love my devices and services, and I love being connected to the global hive mind. I am neither a Luddite nor a hermit, but I am more aware of the price we pay: lack of depth, reduced accuracy, lower quality, impatience, selfishness, and mental exhaustion, to name but a few. In choosing to digitally enhance, hyperconnect, and constantly share our lives, we risk not living them…

Baratunde Thurston 

From his piece #Unplug: Baratunde Thurston left the internet for 25 days, and you should too.

Here’s more about #unplugging

I personally started unplugging one day a week, I’ve done it now for almost 3 years with my family, and it’s changed my life.

Tiffany Shlain, digital filmmaker and founder of the Webby Awards. 

When is the best time to unplug? Here, some options.