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A knee-jerk solution to police violence also creates big privacy problems.
Following the fatal shooting of Michael Brown and subsequent protests in Ferguson, Missouri, there have been increased calls for on-duty police officers to wear body-mounted cameras. Over 145,000 people have signed a whitehouse.gov petition in support of a proposed “Mike Brown Law,” requiring all police officers to wear a camera.
But little has been written about the actual technology of how these cameras work and the broader implications of deploying them en masse. Police departments around the country may range in size from a few dozen to over 1,000 officers. With cameras generating upwards of a gigabyte of video recordings per officer per day, the data storage issue can quickly get out of hand. On top of that, civil liberties organizations have raised concerns about the lack of clear policy for how they should be deployed. Not to mention the potential privacy issues for people recorded during encounters with the cops.
Here are some things that will surprise you about the debate.
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A knee-jerk solution to police violence also creates big privacy problems.

Following the fatal shooting of Michael Brown and subsequent protests in Ferguson, Missouri, there have been increased calls for on-duty police officers to wear body-mounted cameras. Over 145,000 people have signed a whitehouse.gov petition in support of a proposed “Mike Brown Law,” requiring all police officers to wear a camera.

But little has been written about the actual technology of how these cameras work and the broader implications of deploying them en masse. Police departments around the country may range in size from a few dozen to over 1,000 officers. With cameras generating upwards of a gigabyte of video recordings per officer per day, the data storage issue can quickly get out of hand. On top of that, civil liberties organizations have raised concerns about the lack of clear policy for how they should be deployed. Not to mention the potential privacy issues for people recorded during encounters with the cops.

Here are some things that will surprise you about the debate.

Read More>

When the San Francisco Bay Area suffered its worst earthquake in 25 years on Sunday, with a 6.0 rattler in the Napa Valley, one company found themselves in an unusual place to collect data on the tragedy: Wireless device maker Jawbone.
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When the San Francisco Bay Area suffered its worst earthquake in 25 years on Sunday, with a 6.0 rattler in the Napa Valley, one company found themselves in an unusual place to collect data on the tragedy: Wireless device maker Jawbone.

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Have you ever received an amazing email, one that you’d like to print out and pin to your wall, one that made you grin from ear to ear or slow-clap in appreciation and reverence?
When I come across these gems, I drop them into a “Snippets” folder. I study them, I swoon over them, and I borrow bits and pieces of them to send better email.
Now imagine that every email you send is as great as these occasional all-stars you receive.
Impossible? Not at all.
Worth shooting for? Definitely.
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Have you ever received an amazing email, one that you’d like to print out and pin to your wall, one that made you grin from ear to ear or slow-clap in appreciation and reverence?

When I come across these gems, I drop them into a “Snippets” folder. I study them, I swoon over them, and I borrow bits and pieces of them to send better email.

Now imagine that every email you send is as great as these occasional all-stars you receive.

Impossible? Not at all.

Worth shooting for? Definitely.

Read More>

A group of kids has created an app to combat the police abuses seen in Ferguson, and everywhere else.

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The app, called Five-O, is like a detailed version of Yelp for the police. (It’s worth noting that the Ferguson Police Department already has a dismal one-star review on Yelp). After any interaction, someone can answer questions like “Was the stop legitimate?” and “Were you physically assaulted?” and give the officer a grade from A to F. App users can also view scores for a particular department, or browse through departments by county or state.

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Sleep-Tracking Data Shows Who Was Jolted Awake By The Napa Earthquake
At 3:20 a.m. on Sunday morning, a magnitude-6.0 earthquake struck 9 miles south of Napa. It was the strongest quake to hit the Bay Area since 1989.
Now data prepared by Jawbone data scientist Brian Wilt gives us some insight into how strong the jolt was, using anonymous biometric data taken from thousands of Up health trackers worn by NorCal users affected by the quake. 
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Sleep-Tracking Data Shows Who Was Jolted Awake By The Napa Earthquake

At 3:20 a.m. on Sunday morning, a magnitude-6.0 earthquake struck 9 miles south of Napa. It was the strongest quake to hit the Bay Area since 1989.

Now data prepared by Jawbone data scientist Brian Wilt gives us some insight into how strong the jolt was, using anonymous biometric data taken from thousands of Up health trackers worn by NorCal users affected by the quake. 

Read More>

Inside the quest to disrupt death. (Or at least kickstart a slow aging movement.)
“The death by a thousand cuts applies to aging. So I am working to kill aging with a thousand cuts.”
During the dotcom boom, Dave Asprey made $6 million in one swoop. At the age of 26, in the rush of power and possibility that came with that sudden windfall of cash, he felt like nothing was beyond his reach, not even death. “I decided that I was just not going to die,” he tells me, with a smile. “That would be my next challenge.”
And, so, Asprey joined the age-old fight to conquer death.
Over the last 15 years, Asprey has been tinkering with technologies in the hopes of slowing the aging process in his own body. He describes this as bio-hacking, using the hacker mentality to turbocharge his own biochemistry. And to hear Asprey tell it, that’s working: 
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Inside the quest to disrupt death. (Or at least kickstart a slow aging movement.)

“The death by a thousand cuts applies to aging. So I am working to kill aging with a thousand cuts.”

During the dotcom boom, Dave Asprey made $6 million in one swoop. At the age of 26, in the rush of power and possibility that came with that sudden windfall of cash, he felt like nothing was beyond his reach, not even death. “I decided that I was just not going to die,” he tells me, with a smile. “That would be my next challenge.”

And, so, Asprey joined the age-old fight to conquer death.

Over the last 15 years, Asprey has been tinkering with technologies in the hopes of slowing the aging process in his own body. He describes this as bio-hacking, using the hacker mentality to turbocharge his own biochemistry. And to hear Asprey tell it, that’s working: 

Read More>

What it takes to get hired at these top tech companies: A mixture of hard problem-solving skills and the right rapport with company culture.
When you’re hiring, how do you know when someone is right for the job? Is it an intuitive decision, or based solely on the facts of their experience?
It’s not so cut and dry, these leaders say.
“The one piece of advice that I would tell young people getting into the tech industry today is to surround yourself with smart people you can learn from,” says Jess Lee, CEO of Polyvore. When having inspiring comrades around means handpicking them from a crowd of applicants, the process of assembling your all-stars can be overwhelming.
A candidate’s success or failure at your company depends on more than their cover letter and resume. These industry influencers don’t rely on an applicant’s list of experiences, but read between the lines to what makes a great hire.
Read More>

What it takes to get hired at these top tech companies: A mixture of hard problem-solving skills and the right rapport with company culture.

When you’re hiring, how do you know when someone is right for the job? Is it an intuitive decision, or based solely on the facts of their experience?

It’s not so cut and dry, these leaders say.

“The one piece of advice that I would tell young people getting into the tech industry today is to surround yourself with smart people you can learn from,” says Jess Lee, CEO of Polyvore. When having inspiring comrades around means handpicking them from a crowd of applicants, the process of assembling your all-stars can be overwhelming.

A candidate’s success or failure at your company depends on more than their cover letter and resume. These industry influencers don’t rely on an applicant’s list of experiences, but read between the lines to what makes a great hire.

Read More>