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Somewhere in Green Island, New York, there is a tiny wood-framed house filled with mushroom insulation

Up until now, the makers of this innovative little building at Ecovative Design have specialized in packaging products, but now they are focusing their efforts on building materials."The aim is to replace all plastic foams anywhere we can," says Ecovative Design’s Sam Harrington. 

Plastics like styrofoam currently take up between 25%-30% of our landfill space, and a single cubic foot of styrofoam has the same energy content as about one and a half liters of gasoline. 

College pals Eben Bayer and Gavin McIntyre established Ecovative, which grows cost-effective alternatives to plastic insulation and packaging. While they were students at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Bayer and McIntyre experimented with mycelium, the network of vegetative filaments in mushrooms, and realized that it could be used to form incredibly strong bonds. Essentially, the substance functions like a glue that you can grow and use to form agricultural byproducts like plant stalks and seed husks into natural alternatives to styrofoam packaging and insulation. 

There are a lot of roads just sitting there in the sun, doing nothing with all that energy. Why not use them to collect it? Introducing the Solar Roadway, a road built out of solar panels. 
The road is made of three parts: a hard-wearing translucent top-layer with the solar cells, LED lights (for road markings) and a heating element (to keep off snow and ice); an electronics layer to control lighting and communications; and a base plate layer that distributes power to nearby homes and businesses (and perhaps electric vehicle charging stations). Plus, there’s a channel at the edge to collect and filter run-off water (including anti-freeze and other chemicals that normally leeches into the ground). 
More…

There are a lot of roads just sitting there in the sun, doing nothing with all that energy. Why not use them to collect it? Introducing the Solar Roadway, a road built out of solar panels. 

The road is made of three parts: a hard-wearing translucent top-layer with the solar cells, LED lights (for road markings) and a heating element (to keep off snow and ice); an electronics layer to control lighting and communications; and a base plate layer that distributes power to nearby homes and businesses (and perhaps electric vehicle charging stations). Plus, there’s a channel at the edge to collect and filter run-off water (including anti-freeze and other chemicals that normally leeches into the ground). 

More…

Famous Foodies Imagine Dinner Plates From The Future
Food & Wine sent out white paper plates to some of the greatest food thinkers of our time—along with architects, artists, and designers and asked them to imagine the food of the future. 

Gardens vs. Factories, by Jono Pandolfi
Genetic modification gone too far (but vegetables are even easier to match).

Food of the Future for the 1% by Anthony Bourdain.

Pharm to Table by AvroKo.

Dirty Dishes by Gail Simmons. “We can no longer feign naivety at the connection of food and the environment.”

But laughs aside, the undertones here are often quite serious. Following an era of ultimate abundance and globalized food, we’re faced with a deteriorating climate, overfished oceans, and an industrial farming system that’s inflexibly configured for monoculture. In other words, we’d better stock up on edible 3-D printer cartridges, or start getting used to the texture of antenna.

See more entries and read the full story here. 

Famous Foodies Imagine Dinner Plates From The Future

Food & Wine sent out white paper plates to some of the greatest food thinkers of our time—along with architects, artists, and designers and asked them to imagine the food of the future. 

Gardens vs. Factories, by Jono Pandolfi

Genetic modification gone too far (but vegetables are even easier to match).

Food of the Future for the 1% by Anthony Bourdain.

Pharm to Table by AvroKo.

Dirty Dishes by Gail Simmons. “We can no longer feign naivety at the connection of food and the environment.”

But laughs aside, the undertones here are often quite serious. Following an era of ultimate abundance and globalized food, we’re faced with a deteriorating climate, overfished oceans, and an industrial farming system that’s inflexibly configured for monoculture. In other words, we’d better stock up on edible 3-D printer cartridges, or start getting used to the texture of antenna.

See more entries and read the full story here.