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We take you behind the scenes of Chrysler’s widely-acclaimed Super Bowl ad featuring Eminem and his birthplace, Detroit:

The ad was ostensibly for the Chrysler 200, and it roared out from the pack of silliness last night during the third quarter. It did so much so right, offering so many details that showed a real understanding of Motown. Opening shots of factories; interstate road signs to introduce the name “Detroit;” cutting to downtown as the narrator begins to discuss “luxury,” a downtown still resplendent with buildings and architectural detail from a time when Detroit was the richest city in America; straight ahead references to the fact that the city has “been to hell and back”; and finally a ride down Woodward Avenue, ending up outside the beautiful, powerful Fox Theatre, built in 1928, restored in 1988 thanks to the Ilitch family, which also owns the Red Wings and the Tigers. And the tagline, “Imported from Detroit,” is perfect. It blends luxury and quality with Motown pride, while at the same time acknowledging just how much America has wanted to pretend that Detroit is from a different country, an “unAmerican” country that would allow its citizens to live in such despair.

But the biggest choice Wieden + Kennedy and Chrysler made was their choice of spokesmusician. The guy who emerged from that gleaming Chrysler 200 was Eminem, not Kid Rock. Kid Rock is the singer who has been most associated with the revival of the city. His recent 40th birthday concert at Ford Field was a rockfest celebrating the city; he’s sponsored one charitable event after another for Detroit; and he has at least two businesses (“Made in Detroit” clothing and “Badass” Beer) that are local and proud of it.

Great stuff, and if you blow a few paychecks to put a down payment on that new car, we can’t blame you.

Super Bowl Ad Stories: “The Remake,” Featuring LeBron James and Dwight Howard
When it comes to the Super Bowl, advertising agencies can spend months  brainstorming the perfect ad. For Euro RSCG Chicago’s chief creative  officer Jason Peterson, who’s produced four spots for the big game, that  means concepting as many as 60 commercial ideas before finding the  right one.
"There are definitely a different set of parameters  for the Super Bowl—expectations are completely different," he says. "If  you don’t create a talked about, cultural hit, then it’s a waste of $3  million."
Peterson says he and his team start with a basic wish list of ideas.  “When we sit down to write Super Bowl commercials, we write down three  things,” he says. “The first one being monkeys; the second being getting  kicked in the nuts; and maybe the third is some outrageous use of the  product, a catchphrase line, or one of those clichés, like putting a  baby in the commercial.”
The ad man is only half-joking. Year and year, commercials are filled  with monkeys, crotch-kicks, and talking babies. Why? Because they work.  (Read: eTrade baby.) These themes have a long history of success, so why not recycle them for contemporary ads?
For Peterson’s spot last year he followed a similar model, using an  archetype that’s worked magic in Super Bowl after Super Bowl: The  Remake.
Taking a classic commercial and refashioning it for a modern audience is  a sure way to find success. After creating an all-time hit with Cindy  Crawford’s 1992 ad, for example, Pepsi reintroduced the ad years later,  playing off nostalgia for the original—with an updated punch-line.
Click through to see original spots and their remakes, including the classic Michael Jordan and Larry Bird McDonald’s spot remake featuring LeBron James and Dwight Howard.
Related: If you like seeing remakes, check out this series by Kirby Ferguson in which he explores the concept of how Everything is a Remix.

Super Bowl Ad Stories: “The Remake,” Featuring LeBron James and Dwight Howard

When it comes to the Super Bowl, advertising agencies can spend months brainstorming the perfect ad. For Euro RSCG Chicago’s chief creative officer Jason Peterson, who’s produced four spots for the big game, that means concepting as many as 60 commercial ideas before finding the right one.

"There are definitely a different set of parameters for the Super Bowl—expectations are completely different," he says. "If you don’t create a talked about, cultural hit, then it’s a waste of $3 million."

Peterson says he and his team start with a basic wish list of ideas. “When we sit down to write Super Bowl commercials, we write down three things,” he says. “The first one being monkeys; the second being getting kicked in the nuts; and maybe the third is some outrageous use of the product, a catchphrase line, or one of those clichés, like putting a baby in the commercial.”

The ad man is only half-joking. Year and year, commercials are filled with monkeys, crotch-kicks, and talking babies. Why? Because they work. (Read: eTrade baby.) These themes have a long history of success, so why not recycle them for contemporary ads?

For Peterson’s spot last year he followed a similar model, using an archetype that’s worked magic in Super Bowl after Super Bowl: The Remake.

Taking a classic commercial and refashioning it for a modern audience is a sure way to find success. After creating an all-time hit with Cindy Crawford’s 1992 ad, for example, Pepsi reintroduced the ad years later, playing off nostalgia for the original—with an updated punch-line.

Click through to see original spots and their remakes, including the classic Michael Jordan and Larry Bird McDonald’s spot remake featuring LeBron James and Dwight Howard.

Related: If you like seeing remakes, check out this series by Kirby Ferguson in which he explores the concept of how Everything is a Remix.