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We’ve already heard that we need to embrace failure. Now here’s everything we need to know about what that actually means.
It seems like everywhere we turn we’re being told to “embrace failure.” From social media to countless business books and articles and the global failure conference FailCon, the importance of mistakes is lauded as a key stepping-stone for success.
Even advertisers are realizing the power of bragging about getting it wrong. For example, earlier this year Domino’s commercials touted that at their company “failure is an option” with a nod to its failed cookie pizza of 2007.
Despite all the failure-embracing saturation we’re seeing these days, this concept is nothing new. Iterations of “embrace failure” have existed long before the slogan was popular. Before the likes of Steve Jobs and Richard Branson told us to embrace failure, Michael Jordan told us that he fails over and over again. Before that Truman Capote said failure was “the condiment that gives success its flavor.” And before that James Joyce dubbed mistakes “portals of discovery.” Thomas Edison, Abraham Lincoln, Henry Ford—the list of innovators that used failure to get at their success goes on and on and on.
So why the apparent resurgence? More importantly, what does embracing failure really mean, does it work, and at what point is it too much?
In an effort to find the answers, we consulted a few experts who know a thing or two about failure.
Read More>

We’ve already heard that we need to embrace failure. Now here’s everything we need to know about what that actually means.

It seems like everywhere we turn we’re being told to “embrace failure.” From social media to countless business books and articles and the global failure conference FailCon, the importance of mistakes is lauded as a key stepping-stone for success.

Even advertisers are realizing the power of bragging about getting it wrong. For example, earlier this year Domino’s commercials touted that at their company “failure is an option” with a nod to its failed cookie pizza of 2007.

Despite all the failure-embracing saturation we’re seeing these days, this concept is nothing new. Iterations of “embrace failure” have existed long before the slogan was popular. Before the likes of Steve Jobs and Richard Branson told us to embrace failure, Michael Jordan told us that he fails over and over again. Before that Truman Capote said failure was “the condiment that gives success its flavor.” And before that James Joyce dubbed mistakes “portals of discovery.” Thomas Edison, Abraham Lincoln, Henry Ford—the list of innovators that used failure to get at their success goes on and on and on.

So why the apparent resurgence? More importantly, what does embracing failure really mean, does it work, and at what point is it too much?

In an effort to find the answers, we consulted a few experts who know a thing or two about failure.

Read More>

Here is a bit of wisdom from Park and Recreation’s Ron Swanson, plus a few tips to help you be more happy and productive today.
The simple 8-step process to make over your dream schedule-and transform your dream into goals
The 20-minute exercise to eradicate negative thinking
5 tips to stay productive all day long
Have a great day!
[Image: vh1]

Here is a bit of wisdom from Park and Recreation’s Ron Swanson, plus a few tips to help you be more happy and productive today.

Have a great day!

[Image: vh1]

Happy National Dog Day! Here are a few tips for a productive week that will hopefully have you feeling as happy as this guy! 
The 30-minute strategy for creating a successful path to your goals
5, like, totally awesome public speaking lessons from college admissions guides to use at work
6 simple rituals to reach your potential every day
Have a great week!

Happy National Dog DayHere are a few tips for a productive week that will hopefully have you feeling as happy as this guy! 

Have a great week!