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Daily Fast Feed Roundup
Hello Tumblr! Here’s a quick rundown of what you need to know today: 

The Ellen Degeneres Show and Nike are among the most successful brands on Instagram.  
North and South Korean websites suffered outages due to a cyber attack allegedly made by the hacker group Anonymous.
A European official has ruled that Google should be treated like a host, not a publisher. Therefore, it is not obliged to remove content produced by others. 
Barnes & Noble is trying to save money by ceasing in-house production of its Nook readers.
Samsung’s cheap plastic casings may be on the way out. They just linked up with a firm that specializes in carbon fiber. 
Reddit is now hosting a linguistic project that maps the various Arabic languages found throughout the Middle East and Africa.
Have a great day! —M. Cecelia Bittner and Jessica Hullinger

Daily Fast Feed Roundup

Hello Tumblr! Here’s a quick rundown of what you need to know today: 

  • A European official has ruled that Google should be treated like a host, not a publisher. Therefore, it is not obliged to remove content produced by others. 


Have a great day! —M. Cecelia Bittner and Jessica Hullinger

"Starbucks is not a startup. To behave as a startup is completely irresponsible. Innovation is good, but unwarranted testing at the customer’s expense, even at a rather small scale, is unacceptable.”
The world’s largest coffeehouse chain regularly launches products before they’re perfect. Does such a risky approach to innovation work?
A look inside Starbucks’s innovation process, which, as it turns out, is one big leap of faith.

"Starbucks is not a startup. To behave as a startup is completely irresponsible. Innovation is good, but unwarranted testing at the customer’s expense, even at a rather small scale, is unacceptable.”

The world’s largest coffeehouse chain regularly launches products before they’re perfect. Does such a risky approach to innovation work?

A look inside Starbucks’s innovation process, which, as it turns out, is one big leap of faith.

Starbucks Responds To Square Criticism: Innovation is Messy
Starbucks’s response to yesterday’s criticisms about the messy process of paying with Square-

"We do not want to sit on our hands. If we feel excited about something, we’ll get it out there, learn our lessons, and then correct the mistakes. That helps us be a leader."

Read more here.

Starbucks Responds To Square Criticism: Innovation is Messy

Starbucks’s response to yesterday’s criticisms about the messy process of paying with Square-

"We do not want to sit on our hands. If we feel excited about something, we’ll get it out there, learn our lessons, and then correct the mistakes. That helps us be a leader."

Read more here.

Starbucks’s shoddy Square Rollout Baffles Baristas, Confuses Customers
About 7,000 Starbucks locations offer a supposedly simple system for letting customers pay with credit and debit cards using Square wallet. 
Starbucks even invested $25 million in the payments startup. So why can’t baristas make it work?
Read the full story here.
 Have you tried to buy something with Square? Did it work?
[Illustrations by Joel Arbaje]

Starbucks’s shoddy Square Rollout Baffles Baristas, Confuses Customers

About 7,000 Starbucks locations offer a supposedly simple system for letting customers pay with credit and debit cards using Square wallet.

Starbucks even invested $25 million in the payments startup. So why can’t baristas make it work?

Read the full story here.

Have you tried to buy something with Square? Did it work?

[Illustrations by Joel Arbaje]

Interface and product design win again.

When selecting a partner to power mobile payments in its stores, Starbucks could have approached Google, one of the most profitable companies in the world. It could have worked with PayPal, which already has more than 106 million users in the payments space. Or Isis, a consortium formed by telecom giants Verizon, AT&T and T-Mobile that is also producing a “mobile wallet.”
“I’m sure if you and I were to rattle off the names of everyone in the space, that at some level we’ve been in discussions with them,” Starbucks’ Chief Digital Officer Adam Brotman tells Fast Company. Presumably that includes Mastercard, Visa, and Verifone, which handles $10 billion in global transactions per year. But Starbucks chose to partner with Square, a three-year-old startup. Why?
“They’re focused with a level of intensity on the customer experience,” Starbucks CEO Howard Shultz told a small group of reporters Wednesday morning.
In other words, Square treats payments a lot like Starbucks treats coffee: by focusing on the experience around a product that is more or less a commodity.

Why Did Starbucks Choose Square?

Interface and product design win again.

When selecting a partner to power mobile payments in its stores, Starbucks could have approached Google, one of the most profitable companies in the world. It could have worked with PayPal, which already has more than 106 million users in the payments space. Or Isis, a consortium formed by telecom giants Verizon, AT&T and T-Mobile that is also producing a “mobile wallet.”

“I’m sure if you and I were to rattle off the names of everyone in the space, that at some level we’ve been in discussions with them,” Starbucks’ Chief Digital Officer Adam Brotman tells Fast Company. Presumably that includes Mastercard, Visa, and Verifone, which handles $10 billion in global transactions per year. But Starbucks chose to partner with Square, a three-year-old startup. Why?

“They’re focused with a level of intensity on the customer experience,” Starbucks CEO Howard Shultz told a small group of reporters Wednesday morning.

In other words, Square treats payments a lot like Starbucks treats coffee: by focusing on the experience around a product that is more or less a commodity.

Why Did Starbucks Choose Square?