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Andrew Zolli: Why have art in space at all? What does it say about us as a species?
Forest Stearns: Symbolic mark-making has always been an important part of the human experience. From caves to canvases to satellites, we all have an ambition to tell our story. And as we migrate upwards and outwards with space technology, we felt it was important to take this expressive instinct with us.
More> These Mini Satellites Have An Unexpected Addition: Beautiful Art

Andrew ZolliWhy have art in space at all? What does it say about us as a species?

Forest Stearns: Symbolic mark-making has always been an important part of the human experience. From caves to canvases to satellites, we all have an ambition to tell our story. And as we migrate upwards and outwards with space technology, we felt it was important to take this expressive instinct with us.

More> These Mini Satellites Have An Unexpected Addition: Beautiful Art

After the TED talk, Hadfield met with press to discuss all things space. And I had to ask: what does Hadfield think about all the private space companies, like Virgin Galactic and SpaceX, that are popping up? Can they really democratize spaceflight?

"You could ask the exact same question a century ago about airplanes. We’re at 1912 or maybe 1915 in spaceflight. The shuttle is a ridiculous vehicle, and yet it’s the best in the world.

Astronaut Chris Hadfield

image

More> Everyone’s Favorite Astronaut Chris Hadfield On Why He Is Pro SpaceX, Anti “Gravity”

Chris Hadfield is a hero. A boss. The real deal. Not simply because he was Commander of the International Space Station, but for what he did while up there. Not content with being just “an astronaut,” he assumed the role of rock-star spaceman, conducting regular science-experiment videos from space, answering questions like, “What happens to tears in space?” Then, he gave us this: the first video from space. Watching Hadfield’s rendition of David Bowie’s “Space Oddity” while orbiting the Earth is nothing short of sublime. Mr. Hadfield, you win 2013.

NASA engineer Jerry Budd has an idea so audacious that it might just work—he wants to use unmanned, autonomous gliders to send small, low-cost satellites into orbit.

The Towed Glider Air-Launch is an experimental project (still awaiting government approval) that would fire air-launching rocket boosters from a drone glider. In Budd’s modest words, the proposal offers “affordable, flexible access to space.” A glider would be towed into high altitudes by military transport aircraft on planned flights and would be released by the plane—the glider would then fire a rocket booster (with a satellite enclosed) into orbit. Afterward, pilots located in remote NASA facilities safely guide the glider home.

The space gliders would be used to launch cubesats into orbit. Cubesats are small, low-cost satellites that weigh under 200 pounds and can be built and sent into orbit for low cost. Right now, it costs about $50,000 to build a cubesat and $100,000 to put one in orbit. Budd’s proposal would sharply reduce the cost of sending cubesats into space by allowing specialized drones to handle much of the hard work. Instead of sending cubesats into orbit on Russian rockets, NASA could build a new revenue stream by shipping these small satellites into orbit for other entities—effectively meaning the agency would provide space logistics services.

bobbycaputo:


A beautiful death
When a star like our sun uses up all of the hydrogen in its core, it becomes what is called a “planetary nebula.” The star sheds its outer layers of gas, leaving behind a hot core.
This composite image of NGC 2392 includes data from NASA’s Chandra Space Telescope, showing the location of million-degree gas near the center of the planetary nebula in pink. Readings from the Hubble Space Telescope - colored red, green, and blue - show the intricate pattern of the outer layers of the star that have been ejected.

bobbycaputo:

A beautiful death

When a star like our sun uses up all of the hydrogen in its core, it becomes what is called a “planetary nebula.” The star sheds its outer layers of gas, leaving behind a hot core.

This composite image of NGC 2392 includes data from NASA’s Chandra Space Telescope, showing the location of million-degree gas near the center of the planetary nebula in pink. Readings from the Hubble Space Telescope - colored red, green, and blue - show the intricate pattern of the outer layers of the star that have been ejected.

(Source: photoblog.nbcnews.com)

Happy Birthday NASA! 
pbsthisdayinhistory:

July 29, 1958: NASA is Created
On this day in 1958, the United States Congress passed legislation creating the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). Since its creation, NASA has played a vital role in coordinating all of the US’ activity in space. The agency spearheads and sponsors space exhibitions and has launched numerous orbiting satellites that have produced information about the solar system and universe.
In recent years, many feel that NASA has experienced numerous setbacks. The most significant being the end of the space shuttle program in 2011.
Celebrate NASA’s birthday with PBS NewsHour’s video of the agency’s newest vehicle “Curiosity.”
photo:Astronaut Edward H. White II’s Space Walk on Gemini IV ca.1965, (NASA)

Happy Birthday NASA! 

pbsthisdayinhistory:

July 29, 1958: NASA is Created

On this day in 1958, the United States Congress passed legislation creating the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). Since its creation, NASA has played a vital role in coordinating all of the US’ activity in space. The agency spearheads and sponsors space exhibitions and has launched numerous orbiting satellites that have produced information about the solar system and universe.

In recent years, many feel that NASA has experienced numerous setbacks. The most significant being the end of the space shuttle program in 2011.

Celebrate NASA’s birthday with PBS NewsHour’s video of the agency’s newest vehicle “Curiosity.”

photo:Astronaut Edward H. White II’s Space Walk on Gemini IV ca.1965, (NASA)

(via latimes)