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Need to send a package beyond Earth? This “concierge to the stars” and others will handle the logistics. Stamps start at $30,000.

NanoRacks, one of the first companies to enter the field, operates the first commercial laboratory in space aboard the ISS and a panel laboratory that’s attached to the space station. For the price of $30,000 for educational institutions or $60,000 for commercial entities, NanoRacks handles all the logistics related to sending experiments into space. The small, for-profit company will handle the paperwork, find transportation among the many vehicles headed to the ISS, install the experiment, and take care of all governmental relations for would-be space experimenters. The standard NanoRack experiment stays in space for 30 days.

NanoRacks Is The UPS Of Outer Space Shipping

Need to send a package beyond Earth? This “concierge to the stars” and others will handle the logistics. Stamps start at $30,000.

NanoRacks, one of the first companies to enter the field, operates the first commercial laboratory in space aboard the ISS and a panel laboratory that’s attached to the space station. For the price of $30,000 for educational institutions or $60,000 for commercial entities, NanoRacks handles all the logistics related to sending experiments into space. The small, for-profit company will handle the paperwork, find transportation among the many vehicles headed to the ISS, install the experiment, and take care of all governmental relations for would-be space experimenters. The standard NanoRack experiment stays in space for 30 days.

NanoRacks Is The UPS Of Outer Space Shipping

These NASA concept drawings are a big part of why I’m a sci-fi geek today.

The concepts look like America’s post-WWII suburban settlements popped LSD, as if every manicured bush is humming the national anthem while it soars through the galaxy on a psychedelic rainbow. Today, we’re convincing millionaires to book a glorified bus trip into the closest edge of space. In the 1970s, the same efforts could have leased them a two-bed, two-bath condo in the stars, complete with integrated Hi-Fi.

See all the images->

NERD ALERT! Okay, admittedly I shouldn’t be so excited about this, but just watch this video of a new iPad app that displays your iTunes music library as a 3D galaxy! This blows any previously created iTunes visualizer out of the water, ocean, and planet— literally. If you were to project this at a party, your friends might even stop dancing just to look at it. It’s Friday. Get your geek on!

Planetary, a free iPad app from the data-artists at Bloom, is jaw-droppingly, eye-poppingly gorgeous. It analyzes your iTunes music library and visualizes it as a 3D galaxy, where artists become stars that form constellations, albums are planets orbiting those stars, and individual tracks are moons that spin around the planets. It’s “music of the spheres” made stunningly literal. But according to Bloom, it’s so much more than that.

Full writeup from Co.Design.

Could the solution to our growing space junk problem be to add more space junk? Gurudas Ganguli and his colleagues at the US Naval Research Laboratory have conjured up an ingenious and radical idea that involves releasing a giant cloud of tungsten dust, which would then cover the earth and act as a kind of vacuum for space junk. More details of the inventive idea can be found here: How Heavy Metal Dust Could End Our Space Junk Odyssey

Could the solution to our growing space junk problem be to add more space junk? Gurudas Ganguli and his colleagues at the US Naval Research Laboratory have conjured up an ingenious and radical idea that involves releasing a giant cloud of tungsten dust, which would then cover the earth and act as a kind of vacuum for space junk. More details of the inventive idea can be found here: How Heavy Metal Dust Could End Our Space Junk Odyssey