FastCompany Magazine

The official Tumblr of Fast Company.

We talked to the folks behind some of Silicon Valley’s most well-known parties about the importance of play.

Tech parties often get a bad rap. At one recent event, the organizers paid for a 600-pound tiger in a cage and a monkey trained to pose for Instagram photos. Another party for a prominent Googler featured mounds of manmade snow in 70-degree weather. But not all corporate parties are the epitome of Silicon Valley excess.
In fact, historically the best Valley parties have left a huge mark on the industry

Read More>

We talked to the folks behind some of Silicon Valley’s most well-known parties about the importance of play.

Tech parties often get a bad rap. At one recent event, the organizers paid for a 600-pound tiger in a cage and a monkey trained to pose for Instagram photos. Another party for a prominent Googler featured mounds of manmade snow in 70-degree weather. But not all corporate parties are the epitome of Silicon Valley excess.

In fact, historically the best Valley parties have left a huge mark on the industry

Read More>

"There really are two kinds of food entrepreneurs," says venture capitalist Paul Matteucci, who encourages and connects food-tech upstarts through his not-for-profit, Feeding 10 Billion. “There are the ones that hang around Berkeley or Brooklyn, and build businesses mostly for the end consumer. Then there is a whole different group of highly technical people who are building robotics for the field, sensor-based technology, automated watering systems, new food-packaging technologies, and big-data-related inventory control to reduce waste.” These, he says, are “the people who are going to solve the big problems.”

A raft of entrepreneurs and venture capitalists made their money in tech, and now want to do something with an even longer-lasting impact. Meet the Silicon Valley companies trying to fix our broken food system