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Anyone with an Internet connection can now explore where Buzz Aldrin and Neil Armstrong walked on the moon. Zoom out far enough (really far), and you can access Mars as well.
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Anyone with an Internet connection can now explore where Buzz Aldrin and Neil Armstrong walked on the moon. Zoom out far enough (really far), and you can access Mars as well.

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jtotheizzoe:

skunkbear:

Can you survive in space without a spacesuit?

Guardians of the Galaxy has re-ignited the age-old question. Or this slightly different question, asked by Adam Frank, how do you die in space? Here’s some answers.

You know the answer to the question “what happens in space if you aren’t wearing a spacesuit” is going to be “very bad things”, but just what those bad things are is the interesting part.

Also, hi Eric! 

(that’s my friend Eric in the video)

theenergyissue:

The Bio Intelligent Quotient (B.I.Q.) Building is the First Fully Algae-Powered Architecture

Operating successfully for over a year, the Bio Intelligent Quotient (B.I.Q.) building in Hamburg, Germany is the first to be fully powered by algae. The building is covered with 0.78-inch thick panels—200 square meters in total—filled with algae from the Elbe River and pumped full of carbon dioxide and nutrients. The panels, which display the bright green algae, are not only aesthetic, but performative. When sunlight hits the “bioreactor” panels, photosynthesis causes the microorganisms to multiply and give off heat. The warmth is then captured for heating water or storing in saline tanks underground, while algae biomass is harvested and dried. It can either be converted to biogas, or used in secondary pharmaceutical and food products. Residents have no heating bills and the building currently reduces overall energy needs by 50%. 

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“Organs-on-a-chip” don’t look like much: They are very thin clear pieces of plastic, but when they are filled with cells, they take on a life of their own and mimic human systems far more effectively than simple petri dish cell cultures. - The Coming Human Body On A Chip That Will Change How We Make Drugs
No more animal testing and no more guesswork about whether drugs that work on animals might also work on humans. Scientists are making an entire electonic set of organs that can test our drugs quickly and easily.
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“Organs-on-a-chip” don’t look like much: They are very thin clear pieces of plastic, but when they are filled with cells, they take on a life of their own and mimic human systems far more effectively than simple petri dish cell cultures. - The Coming Human Body On A Chip That Will Change How We Make Drugs

No more animal testing and no more guesswork about whether drugs that work on animals might also work on humans. Scientists are making an entire electonic set of organs that can test our drugs quickly and easily.

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Why are advertising students in Alaska studying climate change? The question, says Deborah Morrison, is why isn’t the ad industry studying, and putting its creative might behind climate change, and humanity’s other BIG briefs.
“Why aren’t we as an industry front-and-center in working on the great, wicked issues of our day?”
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Why are advertising students in Alaska studying climate change? The question, says Deborah Morrison, is why isn’t the ad industry studying, and putting its creative might behind climate change, and humanity’s other BIG briefs.

Why aren’t we as an industry front-and-center in working on the great, wicked issues of our day?”

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You may have seen the viral video “Old Man In Nursing Home Reacts To Music.” Filmmaker Michael Rossato-Bennett talks about that moment and his documentary about reaching through dementia with music.

"Our film addresses some subjects people don’t like to talk about, yet it’s a joyous experience because we show that people suffering from memory loss still have this life inside that runs incredibly deep."
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You may have seen the viral video “Old Man In Nursing Home Reacts To Music.” Filmmaker Michael Rossato-Bennett talks about that moment and his documentary about reaching through dementia with music.

image

"Our film addresses some subjects people don’t like to talk about, yet it’s a joyous experience because we show that people suffering from memory loss still have this life inside that runs incredibly deep."

Read More>