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Fantastical NonfictionNames that tune in 3 notes No, it’s not a contestant from the classic TV game show. It’s an IBM computer that uses algorithmic computation to identify a song’s musical period—Baroque, Classical or Romantic— in only three notes. And when applied to speech patterns, the same technology can be used as an early warning system for Parkinson’s disease and certain kinds of psychiatric disorders. Read on →

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Fantastical Nonfiction
Names that tune in 3 notes

No, it’s not a contestant from the classic TV game show. It’s an IBM computer that uses algorithmic computation to identify a song’s musical period—Baroque, Classical or Romantic— in only three notes. And when applied to speech patterns, the same technology can be used as an early warning system for Parkinson’s disease and certain kinds of psychiatric disorders. 
Read on →

Bee hives are a little terrifying. Colonies have 20,000 to 60,000 bees, all of whom beat their wings 200 times per second. It’s amazing, then, that videographer-photographer Michael Sutton, was only stung three times while shooting his high-speed short, Apis Mellifera: Honey Bee.
Watch>

Bee hives are a little terrifying. Colonies have 20,000 to 60,000 bees, all of whom beat their wings 200 times per second. It’s amazing, then, that videographer-photographer Michael Sutton, was only stung three times while shooting his high-speed short, Apis Mellifera: Honey Bee.

Watch>

neurosciencestuff:


Hypnosis: The day my mind was ‘possessed’
I am lying on my back and trapped in a gleaming white tunnel, the surface barely six inches from my nose. There is a strange mechanical rumbling in the background, and I hear footsteps padding around the room beyond. In my mounting claustrophobia, I ask myself why I am here – but there is no way out now. A few moments later, the light dims, and as the man speaks, my thoughts begin to fade.
“The engineer has developed a way of taking control of your thoughts from the inside. He does this because he is fascinated by mind control, and wants to apply the most direct method of controlling your thoughts. He is doing this to advance his research into mind control. You will soon be aware of the engineer inserting his thoughts.”
A strange serenity descends as I realise that soon, my will won’t be my own. Then the experiment begins. I am about to be possessed.

Read more

neurosciencestuff:

Hypnosis: The day my mind was ‘possessed’

I am lying on my back and trapped in a gleaming white tunnel, the surface barely six inches from my nose. There is a strange mechanical rumbling in the background, and I hear footsteps padding around the room beyond. In my mounting claustrophobia, I ask myself why I am here – but there is no way out now. A few moments later, the light dims, and as the man speaks, my thoughts begin to fade.

“The engineer has developed a way of taking control of your thoughts from the inside. He does this because he is fascinated by mind control, and wants to apply the most direct method of controlling your thoughts. He is doing this to advance his research into mind control. You will soon be aware of the engineer inserting his thoughts.”

A strange serenity descends as I realise that soon, my will won’t be my own. Then the experiment begins. I am about to be possessed.

Read more

jtotheizzoe:

Here’s some patriotic prokaryotes to wish you a happy 4th of July full of luminescent liberty!
These light-producing bacteria, known as Photobacterium leiognathi, are ocean-dwelling symbionts, bacteria that live on or within animals, getting protection from their hosts and giving them light-producing tissues in return. 
The anglerfish's glowing bait? That's bioluminescent bacteria. Same with the lanternfish, and certain glowing jellies. 
Thanks for the fireworks, nature!
(via Microbes Rule and Beatrice the Biologist)

jtotheizzoe:

Here’s some patriotic prokaryotes to wish you a happy 4th of July full of luminescent liberty!

These light-producing bacteria, known as Photobacterium leiognathi, are ocean-dwelling symbionts, bacteria that live on or within animals, getting protection from their hosts and giving them light-producing tissues in return. 

The anglerfish's glowing bait? That's bioluminescent bacteria. Same with the lanternfish, and certain glowing jellies. 

Thanks for the fireworks, nature!

(via Microbes Rule and Beatrice the Biologist)