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When the first astronauts landed on the moon, they used rakes to dig up rocks for research. Since then scientists have had to find ways to get planetary dirt samples without manpower. The engineers at Honeybee Robotics believe they’ve found a way—and it’s simpler than you’d think. Watch the video above to see how it works

If the idea of networking makes you nauseous, you’re not alone—and science backs up your disgust.
According to research out of the University of Toronto, professional networking feels icky for good reason. Relationships formed based on a career need, rather than for sincere friendship, trigger our moral disgust—linked, in turn, to physical feelings of uncleanliness. The researchers theorized that this visceral reaction makes us network less frequently, and less effectively.
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If the idea of networking makes you nauseous, you’re not alone—and science backs up your disgust.

According to research out of the University of Toronto, professional networking feels icky for good reason. Relationships formed based on a career need, rather than for sincere friendship, trigger our moral disgust—linked, in turn, to physical feelings of uncleanliness. The researchers theorized that this visceral reaction makes us network less frequently, and less effectively.

Read More>

newyorker:

Months before the U.S. Geological Survey released a study on Yellowstone’s supervolcano, fears of another eruption had already gone viral. George Black writes:

“Doomsday predictions like this have been around for millennia. But their purveyors have never had social media before, and this time their prediction—at least of something significant, if not of a supervolcano eruption—almost came true. At dawn on March 30th, Yellowstone had a 4.8-magnitude earthquake, its biggest in thirty-four years.”

Photograph by Max Waugh/Solent News/AP

newyorker:

Months before the U.S. Geological Survey released a study on Yellowstone’s supervolcano, fears of another eruption had already gone viralGeorge Black writes:

“Doomsday predictions like this have been around for millennia. But their purveyors have never had social media before, and this time their prediction—at least of something significant, if not of a supervolcano eruption—almost came true. At dawn on March 30th, Yellowstone had a 4.8-magnitude earthquake, its biggest in thirty-four years.”

Photograph by Max Waugh/Solent News/AP

(Source: newyorker.com)