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The state of California is suing San Francisco over the waterfront height limit that Bay Area residents voted into law back in June, arguing that the ballot measure usurps state power.
If California finds that measure offensive, wait ‘til San Francisco gets a crack at a ballot proposal to break up the whole damned state. A proposal to divide California into six new states could appear on the November 2016 ballot, courtesy of venture capitalist and self-proclaimed “Riskmaster” Timothy Draper.
According to Six Californias, the proposal has already garnered 1.3 million signatures, the first batch of which Draper submitted to election officials yesterday. If Draper has collected as many signatures as he says he has—and for the millions he’s spent on the effort, it had better be true—then this Six Flags Over California scheme will go before voters the year after next.
Six Californias, One Super City-State - CityLab

It’s official. We’ve found a crazier idea to come out of the Bay Area than this one.

shortformblog:

newsweek:

The state of California is suing San Francisco over the waterfront height limit that Bay Area residents voted into law back in June, arguing that the ballot measure usurps state power.

If California finds that measure offensive, wait ‘til San Francisco gets a crack at a ballot proposal to break up the whole damned state. A proposal to divide California into six new states could appear on the November 2016 ballot, courtesy of venture capitalist and self-proclaimed “Riskmaster” Timothy Draper.

According to Six Californias, the proposal has already garnered 1.3 million signatures, the first batch of which Draper submitted to election officials yesterday. If Draper has collected as many signatures as he says he has—and for the millions he’s spent on the effort, it had better be true—then this Six Flags Over California scheme will go before voters the year after next.

Six Californias, One Super City-State - CityLab

It’s official. We’ve found a crazier idea to come out of the Bay Area than this one.

Getting around San Francisco just got easier, at least if you don’t mind a little bit of wind in your face. The Scoot Network and its fleet of electric-powered scooters just announced that it was expanding, adding five new locations for riders around the city for a grand total of 17 Scoot hubs.
What is Scoot, exactly? Think a CitiBike or ZipCar membership but for green-friendly, Vespa-like mopeds. Since launching 16 months ago, Scoot claims its members have treaded over 50,000 miles, and have kept 62,000 pounds of CO2 out of the environment. 
Read more

Getting around San Francisco just got easier, at least if you don’t mind a little bit of wind in your face. The Scoot Network and its fleet of electric-powered scooters just announced that it was expanding, adding five new locations for riders around the city for a grand total of 17 Scoot hubs.

What is Scoot, exactly? Think a CitiBike or ZipCar membership but for green-friendly, Vespa-like mopeds. Since launching 16 months ago, Scoot claims its members have treaded over 50,000 miles, and have kept 62,000 pounds of CO2 out of the environment. 

Read more

Inside The Social Media Strategy That Made Batkid Go Viral

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The event, while heartwarming, didn’t randomly go viral all on its own (few things do), though it may have seemed like it to anyone watching as #SFBatKid showed up every five seconds in their Twitter streams. Rather, it was a carefully crafted campaign from Clever Girls Collective, a content and social media agency that normally works with clients like Toyota, Dunkin’ Donuts, and Samsung. “We’ve been around for about four years as an under-the-radar social media company. Having an opportunity like Batkid was incredible for us. It showcased what we do every single day,” says Stefania Pomponi, the California company’s co-founder.

The lastest in Ken Block’s driftastic series earned over 20 million views in its first week.

In the hands of director Ben Conrad and veteran rally driver Ken Block, any drab stretch of concrete can be transformed into a vehicular playground. Block, who is also the founder of DC Shoes, became an Internet sensation in 2008, when he uploaded a video of himself practicing a little known motorsport called gymkhana, in which a skilled driver maneuvers a vehicle through an obstacle course. Watching Block’s gymkhana was a little like watching a floor exercise in Olympic gymnastics, but instead of sporting a leotard and bounding across a spring floor, he was strapped into a tricked-out, 650-horsepower rally car and let loose on an abandoned air field. The video went viral overnight.

How To Create A Viral Blockbuster The Gymkhana Way

The lastest in Ken Block’s driftastic series earned over 20 million views in its first week.

In the hands of director Ben Conrad and veteran rally driver Ken Block, any drab stretch of concrete can be transformed into a vehicular playground. Block, who is also the founder of DC Shoes, became an Internet sensation in 2008, when he uploaded a video of himself practicing a little known motorsport called gymkhana, in which a skilled driver maneuvers a vehicle through an obstacle course. Watching Block’s gymkhana was a little like watching a floor exercise in Olympic gymnastics, but instead of sporting a leotard and bounding across a spring floor, he was strapped into a tricked-out, 650-horsepower rally car and let loose on an abandoned air field. The video went viral overnight.

How To Create A Viral Blockbuster The Gymkhana Way