FastCompany Magazine

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Daily Fast Feed Roundup
Hello Tumblr! Here’s a quick rundown of what you need to know today: 
Zynga has filed a trademark infringement claim against the creators of Bang With Friends for using “With Friends" in its name. 
The FAA has approved commercial drone flights in U.S. airspace.
Pro-Assad Syrian hackers compromised the social media and email accounts of a number White House employees.
Researchers in Texas successfully hacked into the navigation system of a yacht that was cruising in the Mediterranean. 
A Hong Kong man claims that his Galaxy S4 burnt down his apartment.
A court has ruled that authorities no longer need a warrant to track cellphone location data.
Swiss scientists have created the perfect tech storm, a 3-D-printed, self-assembling drone swarm. 
Have a great day!
—M. Cecelia Bittner and Jessica Hullinger

Daily Fast Feed Roundup

Hello Tumblr! Here’s a quick rundown of what you need to know today: 

Have a great day!

M. Cecelia Bittner and Jessica Hullinger

Daily Fast Feed Roundup
It’s Friday! Here’s a quick rundown of what you need to know today: 
From our NSA secret surveillance tracker: The U.S. Army has banned access to The Guardian's NSA Prism scandal coverage. 
The Justice Department is investigating former Pentagon general James ‘Hoss’ Cartwright for allegedly leaking info about a massive cyber attack on Iran’s nuclear facilities. 
Facebook is testing out a new chat room feature that would compete directly with Google Hangouts.  
The day after Instagram’s video feature launched, mentions of Vine on Twitter dropped by half a million. 
The New York Times just profiled Wikipedia’s ‘benevolent dictator,’ Jimmy Wales, ‘the world-famous Internet entrepreneur who didn’t become a billionaire.’
The U.K. government is the first to support three-person IVF, a practice in which babies are ‘made’ using three sets of DNA.
Lance Armstrong says he wouldn’t have won the Tour De France with out doping.”I didn’t invent doping, and it didn’t stop when I stopped. I simply participated in a system…”
The San Francisco-based accelerator Angelpad is going bi-coastal with a second head-quarters in NYC.
Samsung now sells $13,000 organic light emitting diode (OLED) TVs. Its rounded design supposedly allows users to view the screen from all angles without the viewing experience being affected.
Soon Time Warner Cable customers will be able use a new app to watch TV via their XBox 360.
The yet-to-be-seen Netflix show ‘Orange is the New Black’ has already been given the green light for a second season. Nobody’s even seen the first season yet.
Watch out Apple, Google is entering the gaming arena with a gaming console, a smart watch, and a new version of its Nexus Q streaming console. 
Have a great weekend! —M. Cecelia Bittner and Jessica Hullinger

Daily Fast Feed Roundup

It’s Friday! Here’s a quick rundown of what you need to know today: 

Have a great weekend! —M. Cecelia Bittner and Jessica Hullinger

Daily Fast Feed Roundup

Hello Tumblr! Here’s a quick rundown of what you need to know today: 
A million Samsung phone users are about to get Jay-Z’s new album three days early and for free! Those lucky ducks.  
Google is combatting child porn with a number of measures including a new image identification system.
Police in 26 states are using facial recognition technology to fight crime.
Netflix is happy right now. The video streaming service is hooking up with DreamWorks for its biggest partnership to date.
Local radio stations can now place targeted ads in their desktop and mobile streams.
This week, a group of homing pigeons will tweet their way across Europe using tiny digital backpacks. 
Word on the street is that Facebook is going to reveal a video functionality for Instagram. But that may not be a great idea…
Today the Supreme Court made some big decisions pertaining to an Arizona voter registration law and a drug patent case.
More from our NSA secret surveillance tracker: Edward Snowden says, “I did not reveal any U.S. operations against legitimate military targets.”


Now you can use Skype’s video messaging app on your computer, iPhone, or Android device.
Have a great week! —M. Cecelia Bittner and Jessica Hullinger
Daily Fast Feed Roundup

Hello Tumblr! Here’s a quick rundown of what you need to know today: 

Have a great week! —M. Cecelia Bittner and Jessica Hullinger

2013’s Most Creative People: 
#2 Samsung’s Dong-hoon Chang
To gather ideas, Chang led his design team on a city-hopping observation tour around the globe, from hot-air-balloon rides in Africa to Singapore’s Skypark on the Marina Bay. “We were able to come up with a new design paradigm,” he says. And with it, a cool factor to rival Apple’s.

2013’s Most Creative People:

#2 Samsung’s Dong-hoon Chang

To gather ideas, Chang led his design team on a city-hopping observation tour around the globe, from hot-air-balloon rides in Africa to Singapore’s Skypark on the Marina Bay. “We were able to come up with a new design paradigm,” he says. And with it, a cool factor to rival Apple’s.

Here’s why Samsung, #17 on our 2013 Most Innovative Companies list, should be lauded not loathed. 

Samsung built a user interface similar to that of the iPhone but gained its real edge by improving one of Samsung’s core strengths: producing big, beautiful screens. In fact, beginning with the company’s entry into the semiconductor business, Samsung has cultivated an ability to quickly study, imitate, and, where appropriate, improve upon competitors’ products. In an age when information flows freely and contract manufacturers can pump out millions of new devices in a matter of weeks, that skill may be the most underrated in business.

[Image: Stephen Doyle]

Here’s why Samsung, #17 on our 2013 Most Innovative Companies list, should be lauded not loathed. 

Samsung built a user interface similar to that of the iPhone but gained its real edge by improving one of Samsung’s core strengths: producing big, beautiful screens. In fact, beginning with the company’s entry into the semiconductor business, Samsung has cultivated an ability to quickly study, imitate, and, where appropriate, improve upon competitors’ products. In an age when information flows freely and contract manufacturers can pump out millions of new devices in a matter of weeks, that skill may be the most underrated in business.

[Image: Stephen Doyle]

"Who wants a Stylus? You have to get ‘em; put ‘em away; you lose ‘em—yuck! Nobody wants a Stylus! We’re going to use the best pointing device in the world…We’re going to use our fingers."
That was Steve Jobs in 2007, as he unveiled the iPhone to the world. But even five years after the unrivaled success of Apple’s smartphone and its subsequent touch-screen iPad cousin, competitors in the space are still heralding the Stylus pen as central to interacting with mobile devices—fingers be damned. A whole range of smartphones and tablets still come with a pen accessory; Microsoft showed off a Stylus in June when it revealed its much ballyhooed Surface tablet; and only this week, Samsung made the S Pen the key differentiator for its Galaxy Note 10.1 tablet. “The S Pen…really, truly changes the game,” said Samsung Electronics America president Tim Baxter.
But even after over a decade on the market, it’s clear brands still have no idea how to market e-ink accessories. Looking back at years of promotions for Stylus pens, what’s readily apparent is how few benefits marketers can imagine for the devices—which is perhaps indicative of how little benefit Stylus pens actually provide consumers.
The Pointless History of Stylus Advertising: The Worst E-Ink Spots From Samsung, HP, Apple

"Who wants a Stylus? You have to get ‘em; put ‘em away; you lose ‘em—yuck! Nobody wants a Stylus! We’re going to use the best pointing device in the world…We’re going to use our fingers."

That was Steve Jobs in 2007, as he unveiled the iPhone to the world. But even five years after the unrivaled success of Apple’s smartphone and its subsequent touch-screen iPad cousin, competitors in the space are still heralding the Stylus pen as central to interacting with mobile devices—fingers be damned. A whole range of smartphones and tablets still come with a pen accessory; Microsoft showed off a Stylus in June when it revealed its much ballyhooed Surface tablet; and only this week, Samsung made the S Pen the key differentiator for its Galaxy Note 10.1 tablet. “The S Pen…really, truly changes the game,” said Samsung Electronics America president Tim Baxter.

But even after over a decade on the market, it’s clear brands still have no idea how to market e-ink accessories. Looking back at years of promotions for Stylus pens, what’s readily apparent is how few benefits marketers can imagine for the devices—which is perhaps indicative of how little benefit Stylus pens actually provide consumers.

The Pointless History of Stylus Advertising: The Worst E-Ink Spots From Samsung, HP, Apple


One important thing you need to know about the S Pen is that it is not a stylus. “Make no mistake, this is not a stylus,” said Travis Merrill, Samsung’s director of tablet marketing, during the same presentation. “Our competitors have nothing like it. The S Pen looks and feels like a pen, yet it’s packed with advanced technology.”
To be fair, it’s a pretty cool stylu—er, “S-Pen.” For one, it uses electromagnetic technology to wirelessly sync with the screen, which helps accuracy. If you increase pressure on the S Pen, for instance, the line will be thicker on the screen. The screen distinguishes between more than 1,000 levels of pressure sensitivity.

Everyone Has A Tablet. Samsung Launched A Pen

One important thing you need to know about the S Pen is that it is not a stylus. “Make no mistake, this is not a stylus,” said Travis Merrill, Samsung’s director of tablet marketing, during the same presentation. “Our competitors have nothing like it. The S Pen looks and feels like a pen, yet it’s packed with advanced technology.”

To be fair, it’s a pretty cool stylu—er, “S-Pen.” For one, it uses electromagnetic technology to wirelessly sync with the screen, which helps accuracy. If you increase pressure on the S Pen, for instance, the line will be thicker on the screen. The screen distinguishes between more than 1,000 levels of pressure sensitivity.

Everyone Has A Tablet. Samsung Launched A Pen