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Monsieur, an artificially intelligent robotic bartender, will take your orders and craft perfectly portioned cocktails to your liking—plus, he doesn’t work for tips.

"As you get older, your tastes become more refined, and you quickly learn it’s expensive to get a quality drink. I thought I could design a machine that could provide consistent-quality cocktails to anyone—not just people who can pay $9 a drink, or even $50 a drink," cofounder and CEO Barry Givens told Fast Company.

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Last week we told you about the humanoid robot that may someday save your life. Your comments were awesome:
"How do we kill it?" asked MARCO. 
To which MAXONEPERCENT responded, “We don’t, we hack it and turn it against them.”
"These robots will be the chalice that holds our brains taken from our bodies developed by the evil Google. Just think ever last life on the earth. We will be the servants of the Liberal overlords." - BOB
"It can’t be bargained with. It can’t be reasoned with. It doesn’t feel pity, or remorse, or fear. And it absolutely will not stop, ever, until you are dead." - SWOOP
"I hope they allow openly gay robots in their ranks." - CHUHYONA
"Save me from a crumbling building? More likely it will haul me out of a crumbling tenement and take me away to a re-education camp or soylent green production facility." - SMERSH

Last week we told you about the humanoid robot that may someday save your life. Your comments were awesome:

"How do we kill it?" asked MARCO.

To which MAXONEPERCENT responded, “We don’t, we hack it and turn it against them.”

"These robots will be the chalice that holds our brains taken from our bodies developed by the evil Google. Just think ever last life on the earth. We will be the servants of the Liberal overlords." - BOB

"It can’t be bargained with. It can’t be reasoned with. It doesn’t feel pity, or remorse, or fear. And it absolutely will not stop, ever, until you are dead." - SWOOP

"I hope they allow openly gay robots in their ranks." - CHUHYONA

"Save me from a crumbling building? More likely it will haul me out of a crumbling tenement and take me away to a re-education camp or soylent green production facility." - SMERSH

The RoboRoach is a $99 kit consisting of electrodes, sensors, and a few batteries that allows anyone to drive their very own cockroach.
Attaching the electronic “backpack” to an unwitting arthropod is not for the squeamish. You must sand down the top of the critter’s head in order to attach a plug, “Exactly like the Matrix,” says Backyard Brains cofounder Greg Gage. Once installed, the system relays electrical impulses over a Bluetooth connection from your phone to the cockroach’s brain, via its antennae. The roach perceives each stimulus to its antennae as an obstacle, and changes direction. The same technique, applied to the cilia of the inner ear, is used in cochlear implants and during deep brain stimulation for treating a variety of disorders.
Greg Gage is an electrical engineer-turned-neuroscience student at the University of Michigan who, with his cofounder Tim Marzullo, started developing the RoboRoach three years ago. "The reason why we started is because I was annoyed that it was so late that I found out about a career in neuroscience. We have one in five people with a neurological disorder and we have no cures—we’re kind of in the dark ages. We want to get kids to understand that this is a career, and you can do so many amazing things."
Watch: The RoboRoach, a remote-controlled cockroach

The RoboRoach is a $99 kit consisting of electrodes, sensors, and a few batteries that allows anyone to drive their very own cockroach.

Attaching the electronic “backpack” to an unwitting arthropod is not for the squeamish. You must sand down the top of the critter’s head in order to attach a plug, “Exactly like the Matrix,” says Backyard Brains cofounder Greg Gage. Once installed, the system relays electrical impulses over a Bluetooth connection from your phone to the cockroach’s brain, via its antennae. The roach perceives each stimulus to its antennae as an obstacle, and changes direction. The same technique, applied to the cilia of the inner ear, is used in cochlear implants and during deep brain stimulation for treating a variety of disorders.

Greg Gage is an electrical engineer-turned-neuroscience student at the University of Michigan who, with his cofounder Tim Marzullo, started developing the RoboRoach three years ago. "The reason why we started is because I was annoyed that it was so late that I found out about a career in neuroscience. We have one in five people with a neurological disorder and we have no cures—we’re kind of in the dark ages. We want to get kids to understand that this is a career, and you can do so many amazing things."

Watch: The RoboRoach, a remote-controlled cockroach


Even whistleblowers nowadays are as likely to leak sensitive information to the Internet as they are to call up a reporter. Once their testimony becomes data, Narrative Science can work its magic. “If the data is there, and a human can write that story using the data, then we can write that story.”
NYU Journalism professor Clay Shirky predicted the rise of robot-journalism in 2009, and wrote that its success will depend on whether audiences can trust a robot to be as authoritative a source as, say, Walter Cronkite.

Your Tweets Are Why The Next Walter Cronkite Will Be A Robot

Even whistleblowers nowadays are as likely to leak sensitive information to the Internet as they are to call up a reporter. Once their testimony becomes data, Narrative Science can work its magic. “If the data is there, and a human can write that story using the data, then we can write that story.”

NYU Journalism professor Clay Shirky predicted the rise of robot-journalism in 2009, and wrote that its success will depend on whether audiences can trust a robot to be as authoritative a source as, say, Walter Cronkite.

Your Tweets Are Why The Next Walter Cronkite Will Be A Robot