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Quotacle lets users search through over 250,000 lines of dialogue from 143 movies.
Everybody knows what the first and second rules of Fight Club are. Ditto the identity of Luke’s father. Sometimes, however, a bit of dialogue drops from someone’s lips and just hangs there in your ear canal, undiagnosed. Neither the title of the film nor the context in which this line was uttered break through the clatter of your overwhelmed modern-day brain. Googling might’ve helped, but it also might not have. Instead, this is a job for the movie quote search engine—a thing that now exists.
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Quotacle lets users search through over 250,000 lines of dialogue from 143 movies.

Everybody knows what the first and second rules of Fight Club are. Ditto the identity of Luke’s father. Sometimes, however, a bit of dialogue drops from someone’s lips and just hangs there in your ear canal, undiagnosed. Neither the title of the film nor the context in which this line was uttered break through the clatter of your overwhelmed modern-day brain. Googling might’ve helped, but it also might not have. Instead, this is a job for the movie quote search engine—a thing that now exists.

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When you make a B movie, it’s best not to question the plot—no matter how ridiculous it is, advises Anthony C. Ferrante, the director of Sharknado, which debuted on Syfy last summer. “It bogs you down if you worry about that stuff,” Ferrante says, musing, “A sharknado can do whatever we tell it to do. It can tear through cars. It can go into the subway. And it doesn’t have to have a reason for anything. That’s the beauty of it. And once you accept it for what it is creatively as a director, you’re liberated because you’re not going, ‘Sharks in a tornado can’t really come into the city and do this!’” 
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When you make a B movie, it’s best not to question the plot—no matter how ridiculous it is, advises Anthony C. Ferrante, the director of Sharknado, which debuted on Syfy last summer. “It bogs you down if you worry about that stuff,” Ferrante says, musing, “A sharknado can do whatever we tell it to do. It can tear through cars. It can go into the subway. And it doesn’t have to have a reason for anything. That’s the beauty of it. And once you accept it for what it is creatively as a director, you’re liberated because you’re not going, ‘Sharks in a tornado can’t really come into the city and do this!’” 

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Missing The World Cup? There’s Still The RoboCup, The World Cup for Robots

It’s been nearly a month since Uruguayan striker Luis Suarez bit Italy’s Giorgio Chiellini on the shoulder in a stadium in Brazil (or, in Suarez’s words “suffered the physical result of a bite in the collusion he suffered with me”). But this week, just a little more than a hundred miles south of where that game took place, one Iranian soccer-playing robot in the RoboCup—the World Cup for robots—malfunctioned, falling on top of one of its Indonesian opponents and ripping off its arm.

Fouls work a little differently at the RoboCup, which for the past 17 years has invited teams of roboticists from all over the globe to pit their soccer-playing machines against one another. This year, the competition is taking place in a Brazilian conference center with a manmade pond and a building shaped like a space-age beard trimmer, where 2,200 human participants (and thousands more spectators) will finish competing for RoboCup titles today.

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"After I read about Google Glass and how we’re going to approach the situation … I’m a blind athlete, and to be able to wear the glasses and have the kids see through my eyes although I can’t even myself, that’s amazing to me," he says. I’m a jumper primarily. There’s a lot of things that go on with that, having someone basically directing me down this runway, and I’m running fast, he’s making calls on the fly. I think it would definitely be cool [for kids to] see how all of that happens, see what that would look like in a visual sense."
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"After I read about Google Glass and how we’re going to approach the situation … I’m a blind athlete, and to be able to wear the glasses and have the kids see through my eyes although I can’t even myself, that’s amazing to me," he says. I’m a jumper primarily. There’s a lot of things that go on with that, having someone basically directing me down this runway, and I’m running fast, he’s making calls on the fly. I think it would definitely be cool [for kids to] see how all of that happens, see what that would look like in a visual sense."

Read More>