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A study from AVAST published Wednesday found one in five men and one in four women admit to checking their partners’ smartphones without their consent. Surveying 13,132 respondents in the U.S., AVAST said a quarter of married women who did check their spouses’ phones did so out of suspicions of infidelity. However, most women did so “because they are nosey,” the company said.

Your Significant Other Is Probably Snooping On Your Smartphone

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Wow people on the first impression with tricks as simple as including your middle initial in your signature, or throwing on a pair of glasses.

For more ways to look like a smarty-pants without cracking a book, check out the video above.

(Source: Fast Company)

If our willpower is indeed like a muscle as some scientists say, then these tricks may help you bulk up.
We are on a constant quest to get as much done as possible, but it’s time that we all become a little more realistic about what can and can’t be achieved through sheer willpower.
Repeat after me: My willpower is limited.
Columbia psychologist Heidi Grant Halvorson argues that our willpower is often not up to the task of resisting temptation. She offers, instead, that we use if-then planning to reduce our reliance on our willpower.
Rather than making a decision when the time comes, if-then planning allows you to plot out your defense ahead of time so that you’ve already made the right decision when the time comes.
Unfortunately, though, we can’t always plan for what’s ahead, which is when our willpower really needs to kick in.
Psychologist Roy F. Baumeister and science writer John Tierney, who wrote a book all about willpower, believe that willpower is like a muscle. It is something that we can build up through the right sustenance and exercise, and it is also something that can get worn out.
Here are some quick tips to boost your mental strength and fortitude:
Read More>

If our willpower is indeed like a muscle as some scientists say, then these tricks may help you bulk up.

We are on a constant quest to get as much done as possible, but it’s time that we all become a little more realistic about what can and can’t be achieved through sheer willpower.

Repeat after me: My willpower is limited.

Columbia psychologist Heidi Grant Halvorson argues that our willpower is often not up to the task of resisting temptation. She offers, instead, that we use if-then planning to reduce our reliance on our willpower.

Rather than making a decision when the time comes, if-then planning allows you to plot out your defense ahead of time so that you’ve already made the right decision when the time comes.

Unfortunately, though, we can’t always plan for what’s ahead, which is when our willpower really needs to kick in.

Psychologist Roy F. Baumeister and science writer John Tierney, who wrote a book all about willpower, believe that willpower is like a muscle. It is something that we can build up through the right sustenance and exercise, and it is also something that can get worn out.

Here are some quick tips to boost your mental strength and fortitude:

Read More>

You can unplug the Internet and pull the shades—or you can phone a friend.
You’re reaching the frayed ends of over-caffeinated overtime and if your inbox pings one more time, you might throw your laptop at a wall. If you had the time to read a whole self-help book on being overwhelmed, well, you wouldn’t need it, would you?
A study published in the Journal of Occupational Health Psychology looks at your options for bailing out of a burnout, before the meltdown starts.
Using a psychology model of coping mechanisms called selection, optimization, and compensation, the researchers tested each method with a sample of 294 employees and their supervisors. Only one of these strategies actually worked. But first, a review of their definitions:
Read More>

You can unplug the Internet and pull the shades—or you can phone a friend.

You’re reaching the frayed ends of over-caffeinated overtime and if your inbox pings one more time, you might throw your laptop at a wall. If you had the time to read a whole self-help book on being overwhelmed, well, you wouldn’t need it, would you?

study published in the Journal of Occupational Health Psychology looks at your options for bailing out of a burnout, before the meltdown starts.

Using a psychology model of coping mechanisms called selection, optimization, and compensation, the researchers tested each method with a sample of 294 employees and their supervisors. Only one of these strategies actually worked. But first, a review of their definitions:

Read More>