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No more excuses: Stop procrastinating and get to work with these tips.
One of the biggest problems you need to solve if you work for yourself is how to make yourself do work.
The best entrepreneurs have figured it out and just pound out the work they need to do.
But many others put off their dream careers, or stay in jobs they don’t like, because they’re afraid to figure this out. Being in a job, or staying in college, means that you have someone else imposing work and deadlines on you, and you’ll get fired (or dropped from school) if you don’t do the work. So you put off doing the work until you can’t anymore because of the fear of being fired.
What does this say about us? It’s saying that we can’t trust ourselves enough to figure out how to motivate ourselves. I know, because I was in this boat for many years. It wasn’t until I started to learn to solve this problem that I found the courage to work for myself.
It’s solvable. It’s not easy, but it’s doable. And you can do it just as much as I can—I’m no superman, trust me. I feel lazy, I procrastinate, I fear failure, just like anyone else. But I’ve learned a few things that work for me.
What works for you will be different, but here are some ideas I use that might help:
Read More> 

No more excuses: Stop procrastinating and get to work with these tips.

One of the biggest problems you need to solve if you work for yourself is how to make yourself do work.

The best entrepreneurs have figured it out and just pound out the work they need to do.

But many others put off their dream careers, or stay in jobs they don’t like, because they’re afraid to figure this out. Being in a job, or staying in college, means that you have someone else imposing work and deadlines on you, and you’ll get fired (or dropped from school) if you don’t do the work. So you put off doing the work until you can’t anymore because of the fear of being fired.

What does this say about us? It’s saying that we can’t trust ourselves enough to figure out how to motivate ourselves. I know, because I was in this boat for many years. It wasn’t until I started to learn to solve this problem that I found the courage to work for myself.

It’s solvable. It’s not easy, but it’s doable. And you can do it just as much as I can—I’m no superman, trust me. I feel lazy, I procrastinate, I fear failure, just like anyone else. But I’ve learned a few things that work for me.

What works for you will be different, but here are some ideas I use that might help:

Read More> 

How To Make Procrastination A Force For Productivity
Over at 99u, iDoneThis cofounder Adrian Chen writes about cultivating the (in)discipline ofstructured procrastination, a productivity technique that cooperates with your urge to put things off, so long as you get other to-do’s done now.
The technique happens in two steps: 
Give in to your urge to procrastinate
Do a less crucial, but still productive, task

The key, then, is to make sure that you’re not clicking through Facebook photos or scrutinizing TMZ instead of doing work, but rather taking on tasks that are less frightful than that Very Important Task that you ought to be getting done. So, in reality, there are three steps: 
Give in to your urge to procrastinate
Avoid time-wasting fluffery
Do a less crucial, but still productive, task
As Chen writes, structured procrastination transforms a negative habit into something much more positive. 
"You can take that feeling of ‘I’d rather do anything than this particular thing’—which normally sends you to sort the sock drawer or go on a Netflix spree—and use it as a force for productivity."
The trick: The to-do list, with the most urgent and important on top, and still-worthwhile tasks live down below. Ergo, in order to not do the Very Important Thing, you do the Still Important Things, so that do-it-later turns into do.
[Image: Flickr user Max Sang]

How To Make Procrastination A Force For Productivity

Over at 99u, iDoneThis cofounder Adrian Chen writes about cultivating the (in)discipline ofstructured procrastination, a productivity technique that cooperates with your urge to put things off, so long as you get other to-do’s done now.

The technique happens in two steps: 

  1. Give in to your urge to procrastinate
  2. Do a less crucial, but still productive, task

The key, then, is to make sure that you’re not clicking through Facebook photos or scrutinizing TMZ instead of doing work, but rather taking on tasks that are less frightful than that Very Important Task that you ought to be getting done. So, in reality, there are three steps: 

  1. Give in to your urge to procrastinate
  2. Avoid time-wasting fluffery
  3. Do a less crucial, but still productive, task

As Chen writes, structured procrastination transforms a negative habit into something much more positive. 

"You can take that feeling of ‘I’d rather do anything than this particular thing’—which normally sends you to sort the sock drawer or go on a Netflix spree—and use it as a force for productivity."

The trick: The to-do list, with the most urgent and important on top, and still-worthwhile tasks live down below. Ergo, in order to not do the Very Important Thing, you do the Still Important Things, so that do-it-later turns into do.

[Image: Flickr user Max Sang]

Being smart, energetic, and creative won’t save you from procrastination, but knowing the whys and hows of it can be a big help. Here are four things you might not know about your worst habit. Read more->

Being smart, energetic, and creative won’t save you from procrastination, but knowing the whys and hows of it can be a big help. Here are four things you might not know about your worst habit. Read more->