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This has never been done before,” boasts Mike Janke, Silent Circle’s CEO. “It’s going to revolutionize the ease of privacy and security.

The Threat Of Silence

The privacy experts over at Silent Circle have announced a new encryption data transfer app that will let people send files securely from their iPhone or tablets. 

The technology uses a sophisticated peer-to-peer encryption technique that allows users to send encrypted files of up to 60 megabytes through a “Silent Text” app. The sender of the file can set it on a timer so that it will automatically “burn”—deleting it from both devices after a set period of, say, seven minutes. 

This app is sure to fuel government paranoia since it keeps its users and their information virtually untraceable. 

Click here the full story.

If it’s not SSL, you’re screwed.

Cyber Monday tip: We’ve been told for years that on any site that’s requesting your credit card number, you should be absolutely sure you see HTTPS in the browser bar and a padlock icon in the browser, yet millions of people continue to be taken in by this simple scam. Beyond the risk of someone “eavesdropping” on your sensitive information, the lack of SSL is a sure sign that you’re not dealing with a reputable store. Adding SSL to a site can cost as little as $10 and has been de rigueur for almost fifteen years, so any site lacking this basic protection is a huge red flag (but because it’s only $10, the presence of that padlock doesn’t mean very much by itself).

More Cyber Monday tips from Dayna Steele here!

At a Congressional hearing this morning that veered into contentious arguments and cringe-worthy moments, the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) spilled the beans on their social media monitoring project.
DHS Chief Privacy Office Mary Ellen Callahan and Director of Operations Coordination and Planning Richard Chavez appeared to be deliberately stonewalling Congress on the depth, ubiquity, goals, and technical capabilities of the agency’s social media surveillance. At other times, they appeared to be themselves unsure about their own project’s ultimate goals and uses. But one thing is for sure: If you’re the first person to tweet about a news story, or if you’re a community activist who makes public Facebook posts—DHS will have your personal information.

 Department Of Homeland Security Tells Congress Why It’s Monitoring Facebook, Twitter, Blogs

At a Congressional hearing this morning that veered into contentious arguments and cringe-worthy moments, the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) spilled the beans on their social media monitoring project.

DHS Chief Privacy Office Mary Ellen Callahan and Director of Operations Coordination and Planning Richard Chavez appeared to be deliberately stonewalling Congress on the depth, ubiquity, goals, and technical capabilities of the agency’s social media surveillance. At other times, they appeared to be themselves unsure about their own project’s ultimate goals and uses. But one thing is for sure: If you’re the first person to tweet about a news story, or if you’re a community activist who makes public Facebook posts—DHS will have your personal information.

Department Of Homeland Security Tells Congress Why It’s Monitoring Facebook, Twitter, Blogs

Privacy has been a hot topic lately with the recent discovery that your iPhone and iPad can track your every move. Artist Martin Backes has come up with a surveillance chic solution for the fashion-conscious paranoiac. Enjoy!

Do you lie awake at night, dreading that your kisser will show up on  some stranger’s screen in the background of a Google Street View image?  Then you need therapy. But if you can’t afford that, Martin Backes has  designed some conceptual fashion headwear to assuage your paranoia. "Pixelhead" is a full-coverage mask decorated in pixelated colors, so that if you  do get caught by Google Street View’s cameras, your privacy is assured.  Your outrageous headwear will likely become viral meme-fodder all the  same, but that’s beside the point. Continued…

Privacy has been a hot topic lately with the recent discovery that your iPhone and iPad can track your every move. Artist Martin Backes has come up with a surveillance chic solution for the fashion-conscious paranoiac. Enjoy!

Do you lie awake at night, dreading that your kisser will show up on some stranger’s screen in the background of a Google Street View image? Then you need therapy. But if you can’t afford that, Martin Backes has designed some conceptual fashion headwear to assuage your paranoia. "Pixelhead" is a full-coverage mask decorated in pixelated colors, so that if you do get caught by Google Street View’s cameras, your privacy is assured. Your outrageous headwear will likely become viral meme-fodder all the same, but that’s beside the point. Continued…


You can’t download an app these days without it asking for your location—and not just on check-in services like Foursquare and Gowalla. Google Maps, Instagram, Twitter,  Square, MenuPages, Shazam—they all want to know exactly where you are  whenever you’re using the app. Heck, services like Google Latitude won’t  even let you decline to share your location—it’ll just put you through  an endless cycle of notifications, almost demanding you to accept its  terms.
Perhaps that’s why location sharing has become such a huge concern for  users, who worry they’re giving out too much data via their GPS-enabled  smartphones. According to a report out today by Nielsen, a whopping 59% of females and 52% of males have privacy concerns when it comes to location-based services.

Will marketers ever be able to earn our trust?

You can’t download an app these days without it asking for your location—and not just on check-in services like Foursquare and Gowalla. Google Maps, Instagram, Twitter, Square, MenuPages, Shazam—they all want to know exactly where you are whenever you’re using the app. Heck, services like Google Latitude won’t even let you decline to share your location—it’ll just put you through an endless cycle of notifications, almost demanding you to accept its terms.

Perhaps that’s why location sharing has become such a huge concern for users, who worry they’re giving out too much data via their GPS-enabled smartphones. According to a report out today by Nielsen, a whopping 59% of females and 52% of males have privacy concerns when it comes to location-based services.

Will marketers ever be able to earn our trust?