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We’re finding some super aggressive colonies that are attaching to plastic very well.

Researchers have discovered microbial communities living on the waste we dump in the ocean.

Their study found 1,000 different types of bacteria on ocean plastic samples, including plants, algae, autotrophs, and predators. They warn that plastic is also serving as a new kind of transportation for potentially harmful bacteria looking to hitch a ride across the ocean. 

Watch The Even More Anti-Consumption SodaStream Ad The Super Bowl Didn’t Want You To See

During the Super Bowl, home soda maker SodaStream aired an ad to the effect that using their product (recently redesigned by Yves Behar) would result in millions of fewer plastic bottles. This was illustrated by huge amounts of anonymous soda bottles exploding as people used their soda stream.

However, the company first submitted the video at the top of this post, which more explicitly calls out the companies that actually make the soda that goes in the plastic bottles. But that ad was rejected, presumably because it called out two major Super Bowl sponsors.

Here’s more on plastic from Fast Company:

Artist Finds Beauty In The Garbage Choked Ocean.
The sometimes eerie images featured in Mandy Barker’s photo series, called Soup, draw attention to the issue of ocean pollution.
This isn’t the first time that Fast Company has addressed this topic. 
The Problem:
Whoops! There Is Way More Plastic In The Ocean Than We Thought
This Is What It’s Like To Sail In The Pacific Trash Vortex
Innovative Ways That People Are Trying to Fix the Problem:
Paradise Recycled: Architects Dream of Turning Great Pacific Garbage Patch Into Habitable Island
So Long, Pacific Trash Vortex, Hello Diesel Fuel
Electrolux Unveils Vacuums Decorated With Ocean Debris
Method Cleans Up Ocean Plastic for Soap Bottles
5 Simple Ways To Drastically Reduce Our Plastic Consumption

[Images by Mandy Barker][Post by M.Cecelia Bittner]

Artist Finds Beauty In The Garbage Choked Ocean.

The sometimes eerie images featured in Mandy Barker’s photo series, called Soup, draw attention to the issue of ocean pollution.

This isn’t the first time that Fast Company has addressed this topic. 

The Problem:

Innovative Ways That People Are Trying to Fix the Problem:


image

[Images by Mandy Barker][Post by M.Cecelia Bittner]

But WikiCells is no mere As Seen On TV™ gadget and Edwards says it’s no mere conceptual provocation either—the launch in Paris proves this. The technology already exists: Electrostatic charges can transform a sugar processing bi-product called bagasse, mixed with chitosan and alginate, into an edible shell membrane. Now any food you might find wrapped in plastic in the store can come in a shell made just using this technology. You’ll be able to peel the shell off and compost the skin like a banana peel or, take a step beyond biodegradable, eat the whole thing like you would chew a grape.

A Package You Can Eat, To Prevent Plastic Pollution

We have reported extensively on the nasty chemicals inside plastics for some time now. Namely, the ugliness that is BPA. Here’s something you may not have known. BPA. Is. Everywhere. We’re talkin’ adhesives, dental fillings, the linings of food and drink cans. But wait… there’s more:

It’s  a building block for polycarbonate, a near-shatterproof plastic used in  cell phones, computers, eyeglasses, drinking bottles, medical devices,  and CDs and DVDs. It’s also in infant-formula cans and many clear  plastic baby bottles.

Here are some tips for avoiding this toxic, cancer causing compound. And don’t forget to check out today’s Fresh Air from NPR.
nprfreshair:

Today’s Fresh Air, Susan Freinkel on chemicals in plastics: “These chemicals act in a more convoluted and complicated way.  ”They interfere with our hormones and they interfere with the endocrine system, which is the network of glands that orchestrate growth and development. And there’s some research showing that DEHP, this chemical that’s in vinyl [used in IV bags] has this property. It interferes with testosterone.” [complete interview here]

We have reported extensively on the nasty chemicals inside plastics for some time now. Namely, the ugliness that is BPA. Here’s something you may not have known. BPA. Is. Everywhere. We’re talkin’ adhesives, dental fillings, the linings of food and drink cans. But wait… there’s more:

It’s a building block for polycarbonate, a near-shatterproof plastic used in cell phones, computers, eyeglasses, drinking bottles, medical devices, and CDs and DVDs. It’s also in infant-formula cans and many clear plastic baby bottles.

Here are some tips for avoiding this toxic, cancer causing compound. And don’t forget to check out today’s Fresh Air from NPR.

nprfreshair:

Today’s Fresh Air, Susan Freinkel on chemicals in plastics: “These chemicals act in a more convoluted and complicated way.  ”They interfere with our hormones and they interfere with the endocrine system, which is the network of glands that orchestrate growth and development. And there’s some research showing that DEHP, this chemical that’s in vinyl [used in IV bags] has this property. It interferes with testosterone.” [complete interview here]