FastCompany Magazine

The official Tumblr of Fast Company.

"There really are two kinds of food entrepreneurs," says venture capitalist Paul Matteucci, who encourages and connects food-tech upstarts through his not-for-profit, Feeding 10 Billion. “There are the ones that hang around Berkeley or Brooklyn, and build businesses mostly for the end consumer. Then there is a whole different group of highly technical people who are building robotics for the field, sensor-based technology, automated watering systems, new food-packaging technologies, and big-data-related inventory control to reduce waste.” These, he says, are “the people who are going to solve the big problems.”

A raft of entrepreneurs and venture capitalists made their money in tech, and now want to do something with an even longer-lasting impact. Meet the Silicon Valley companies trying to fix our broken food system

This Is What New York Looks Like From the Edge of a Skyscraper

Superheroes and window washers aside, most New Yorkers don’t spend much time leaning off rooftops 50 stories above the ground. But the view straight down is fairly spectacular.

It’s a side of the city most people never see in quite this way, which is one of the reasons Navid Baraty’s series of photos ended up on the walls of the Bowling Green subway station as part of the MTA’s Arts for Transit program.

These Victorian Baby Pictures Are Filled With Hidden People
Why didn’t the mothers simply pose with their children? According to Linda Fregni Nagler, editor of The Hidden Mother, a new book that collects 1,002 photographs (from daguerrotypes to cartes de visite, and cabinet cards) in which a mother is hiding somewhere in the portrait of her progeny,


it reflects one of the core instincts of motherhood: to deny oneself in deference to the child. In the case of the photographs compiled in The Hidden Mother, Nagler notes that mothers have often opted to hide themselves in order to immortalize a child who might not live to be the subject of another photo, owing to the high infant mortality rates of the period.

These Victorian Baby Pictures Are Filled With Hidden People

Why didn’t the mothers simply pose with their children? According to Linda Fregni Nagler, editor of The Hidden Mother, a new book that collects 1,002 photographs (from daguerrotypes to cartes de visite, and cabinet cards) in which a mother is hiding somewhere in the portrait of her progeny,

it reflects one of the core instincts of motherhood: to deny oneself in deference to the child. In the case of the photographs compiled in The Hidden Mother, Nagler notes that mothers have often opted to hide themselves in order to immortalize a child who might not live to be the subject of another photo, owing to the high infant mortality rates of the period.