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This Is What New York Looks Like From the Edge of a Skyscraper

Superheroes and window washers aside, most New Yorkers don’t spend much time leaning off rooftops 50 stories above the ground. But the view straight down is fairly spectacular.

It’s a side of the city most people never see in quite this way, which is one of the reasons Navid Baraty’s series of photos ended up on the walls of the Bowling Green subway station as part of the MTA’s Arts for Transit program.

These Victorian Baby Pictures Are Filled With Hidden People
Why didn’t the mothers simply pose with their children? According to Linda Fregni Nagler, editor of The Hidden Mother, a new book that collects 1,002 photographs (from daguerrotypes to cartes de visite, and cabinet cards) in which a mother is hiding somewhere in the portrait of her progeny,


it reflects one of the core instincts of motherhood: to deny oneself in deference to the child. In the case of the photographs compiled in The Hidden Mother, Nagler notes that mothers have often opted to hide themselves in order to immortalize a child who might not live to be the subject of another photo, owing to the high infant mortality rates of the period.

These Victorian Baby Pictures Are Filled With Hidden People

Why didn’t the mothers simply pose with their children? According to Linda Fregni Nagler, editor of The Hidden Mother, a new book that collects 1,002 photographs (from daguerrotypes to cartes de visite, and cabinet cards) in which a mother is hiding somewhere in the portrait of her progeny,

it reflects one of the core instincts of motherhood: to deny oneself in deference to the child. In the case of the photographs compiled in The Hidden Mother, Nagler notes that mothers have often opted to hide themselves in order to immortalize a child who might not live to be the subject of another photo, owing to the high infant mortality rates of the period.

In the book Our Beautiful, Fragile World, photojournalist Peter Essick takes us on a tour of the world’s altered landscapes, from an eroded hillside in Joshua Tree National Park to an oil sands mining operation in Alberta, Canada’s boreal forest. “Our natural world is constantly changing,” writes Essick. “What is different among landscapes is the rate and degree of change. After viewing the images, it’s impossible not to wonder: how can we do better?” 

More breathtaking photos at Co.Exist

LEADERSHIP IN THE FIELD: MARINES, ARMY, AFGHAN NATIONAL ARMY

E.B. Boyd, embedded reporter in Afghanistan, profiles the leadership transition from the Marines to the Afghan National Army, and the effort and innovation behind it.

LEAD OR DIE 

Lt. Col. Philip Treglia and photographer Teru Kuwayama will be featured speakers at tomorrow’s Innovation Uncensored SF conference. Join us.