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This is the new HTC One. 

So what’s new about it?
At first glance it looks awfully similar to the old one, no? There are quite a few hardware differences once you spend some time with it, though. The screen is a little bigger (5.0 inches versus 4.7 inches) and its all-metal body has a little more heft to it. During a pre-briefing, the phone felt very sturdy. Solid. “This year with the HTC One we really wanted to double down on what was working very well on that design, which was about 70% metal,” Scott Croyle, HTC senior vice president of design, told Fast Company. “We’re actually able to get 90% metal now… all the way around to the front housing. It creates fewer breaks and a purer design.”

More

Google reveals “Project Tango,” a phone that maps the world in 3-D.

Project Tango is an experimental new smartphone with built-in 3-D sensors that, according to Google, allow wielders to digitally map the world around them. Its spatially aware motion-sensing powers work using a “revolutionary” new Myriad 1 vision processor, which harvests a fraction of the computing power needed for something like, say, Microsoft’s Kinect. It’s like cramming a 3-D scanner into a Pop Tart.

Motorola announced Thursday that its new Moto X phone will run on Android 4.2.2, include a software optimized Qualcomm Snapdragon S4 Pro processor, and have a 4.7” active display (316 ppi). But only the geekiest among us knows what any of that actually means. What the rest of us will notice first about the Moto X, and its biggest differentiator, is what’s on the outside:
Instead of a flat back, the phone contours to fit your hand. And instead of standard color options, Motorola is launching a “Moto Maker” website where customers can customize their phone’s design.
The customization site, which will only be available with AT&T when the phone launches in late August, will allow users to choose from 18 different back colors, a black or white front color, and 7 accent colors for buttons and the ring around the back camera. Consumers can also print something on the back of their phones, like a name or email address, and change options like the welcome message and wallpaper before the phone is even shipped to them. Sol Republic will make matching ear buds, headphones and speakers available for purchase with the phone.
Here’s what else we know about the Moto X

Motorola announced Thursday that its new Moto X phone will run on Android 4.2.2, include a software optimized Qualcomm Snapdragon S4 Pro processor, and have a 4.7” active display (316 ppi). But only the geekiest among us knows what any of that actually means. What the rest of us will notice first about the Moto X, and its biggest differentiator, is what’s on the outside:

Instead of a flat back, the phone contours to fit your hand. And instead of standard color options, Motorola is launching a “Moto Maker” website where customers can customize their phone’s design.

The customization site, which will only be available with AT&T when the phone launches in late August, will allow users to choose from 18 different back colors, a black or white front color, and 7 accent colors for buttons and the ring around the back camera. Consumers can also print something on the back of their phones, like a name or email address, and change options like the welcome message and wallpaper before the phone is even shipped to them. Sol Republic will make matching ear buds, headphones and speakers available for purchase with the phone.

Here’s what else we know about the Moto X

A Printable Guide To Unplugging

So you need to #unplug. You’re feeling overwhelmed by your gadgets—connected to your email list but not to your personal life. It’s time to take a break. It is precisely for times like these that we’ve created a guide to unplugging.

These step-by-step instructions will walk you through the difficult (but rewarding!) process of unplugging, from deciding when to unplug to informing your friends and coworkers that you’ll be offline for a while to avoiding the biggest temptations to plug back in. Here you’ll find advice from digital detoxing experts, business leaders, and our readers, whom we asked to use the #unplug hashtag to submit their best methods for logging off.

We encourage you to print these pages, and when you find yourself reaching for your phone, reach for this guide instead for tips on how to overcome the urge to use your devices. And when you’re ready to rejoin the digital world, come to FastCompany.com, and we’ll help you find the most seamless way to do so.

Let the detoxing begin!

How the NSA monitors America’s phone traffic

scoop from The Guardian confirmed what many people suspected—the National Security Agency (NSA) is spying on the phone activity of millions of Americans. Using a secret court order, which was not disclosed to the public, the NSA obtained bulk phone records for Verizon’s customers on a daily basis. Each day, the NSA would receive a massive flood of data from Verizon.

How do they do it, and what can they do with the information? 

Apple has a problem: Social media chatter about it’s iPhone 5 has dipped, and so have sales. 
From September to today, the number of conversations on social channels about iPhones has declined for two of the company’s target audiences: Baby Boomers and Generation Xers.Looking at two other lucrative consumer audiences—Millennials and teens— shows a similar pattern. Despite a spike in conversations around last Christmas, iPhone conversations have been consistently declining since the iPhone 5 launch in October.
Apple’s failure to tap into what’s being said through social insights and develop a data-driven marketing strategy is becoming an object lesson for businesses everywhere. 
Inside Apple’s marketing problem

Apple has a problem: Social media chatter about it’s iPhone 5 has dipped, and so have sales. 

From September to today, the number of conversations on social channels about iPhones has declined for two of the company’s target audiences: Baby Boomers and Generation Xers.Looking at two other lucrative consumer audiences—Millennials and teens— shows a similar pattern. Despite a spike in conversations around last Christmas, iPhone conversations have been consistently declining since the iPhone 5 launch in October.

Apple’s failure to tap into what’s being said through social insights and develop a data-driven marketing strategy is becoming an object lesson for businesses everywhere. 

Inside Apple’s marketing problem

fastcodesign:




A new app called Moves could be the simplest fitness app ever.

It lives in your iPhone and tracks your activity in the background, so there’s no separate device to learn how to use or remember to carry (you already have your phone on you at all times). 
There’s no setup: You install it, turn it on, and that’s it. 
And there’s no management, syncing, or any other “interactive” bullshit to forget to do or get bored of and stop doing altogether. You don’t even have to launch it—Moves will simply ding a little summary of your physical activity into your Notifications Center every day, where you’ll end up seeing it regardless of what you’re doing with your phone.
Essentially, Moves gives you no more excuses.

fastcodesign:

A new app called Moves could be the simplest fitness app ever.
  • It lives in your iPhone and tracks your activity in the background, so there’s no separate device to learn how to use or remember to carry (you already have your phone on you at all times).
  • There’s no setup: You install it, turn it on, and that’s it.
  • And there’s no management, syncing, or any other “interactive” bullshit to forget to do or get bored of and stop doing altogether. You don’t even have to launch it—Moves will simply ding a little summary of your physical activity into your Notifications Center every day, where you’ll end up seeing it regardless of what you’re doing with your phone.
Essentially, Moves gives you no more excuses.

(Source: fastcodesign)

The Facebook Phone is finally here. And, as expected, it’s not really a phone at all.
Home, as the new product is called, is a free, downloadable skin that gives existing Android phone a total Facebook makeover, transforming both lock and home screens into immersive, edge-to-edge slideshows of photos and status updates.

The Facebook Phone is finally here. And, as expected, it’s not really a phone at all.

Home, as the new product is called, is a free, downloadable skin that gives existing Android phone a total Facebook makeover, transforming both lock and home screens into immersive, edge-to-edge slideshows of photos and status updates.

(Source: fastcodesign.com)