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How Coca-Cola Used Vending Machines To Try To Unite The People Of India And Pakistan 

Relations between India and Pakistan are marked by many things—and happiness is generally not one of them. But Coca-Cola recently brought people from both nations together—or at least brought citizens of both countries face to face—over vending machines.

No ordinary vending machines, the Small World Machines, created by Coke and Leo Burnett, were equipped with full-length webcams that allowed participants to see each other and interact in real time. They were placed in malls—one in Lahore, Pakistan, the other in New Dehli, India—in March. 

As part of its larger mission to associate its product with happiness 

“Coke has always been a brand that’s about positivity and optimism, and we’re always talking about how we can provoke just a little bit more happiness in the world, and increasingly we’ve tried to create experiences to actually bring people together in intimate moments of connectivity,” Jantos Tulloch says.

“Telling this story through the lens of India and Pakistan really came from our team on the ground there who knows better than anyone that the people really want more positive connection and more positive communication between them.”

Read the full story here.

 


On May 2, four helicopters carrying two-dozen U.S. Navy SEALs snuck  into Pakistan bound for Abottabad, flying low to avoid detection by  radar (that was switched off anyway).  Leading the way were a pair of Sikorsky UH-60 Black Hawks modified for  extra stealth, including radar-absorbent coatings on their skin and tail  rotors with extra blades, dampening the noise. These and other features  were borrowed, analysts would later speculate, from the RAH 66 Comanche—a stealth helicopter prototype canceled by the Pentagon in 2004.
You know what happened next: The commandos landed inside Osama bin  Laden’s compound before the occupants knew they were there. (Neighbors  later reported they didn’t hear the choppers until they were on top of  them.) But one of the Black Hawks lost lift upong take off, and clipped  its tail on the wall of the compound. The SEALs blew it up before  escaping, preventing the top-secret technology from falling into  Pakistan’s hands. Or so they thought.

How a split-second stall in a top-secret chopper could lead to a  new-and-improved Chinese stealth fighter and greatly alter the  international arms race—in four easy steps.

On May 2, four helicopters carrying two-dozen U.S. Navy SEALs snuck into Pakistan bound for Abottabad, flying low to avoid detection by radar (that was switched off anyway). Leading the way were a pair of Sikorsky UH-60 Black Hawks modified for extra stealth, including radar-absorbent coatings on their skin and tail rotors with extra blades, dampening the noise. These and other features were borrowed, analysts would later speculate, from the RAH 66 Comanche—a stealth helicopter prototype canceled by the Pentagon in 2004.

You know what happened next: The commandos landed inside Osama bin Laden’s compound before the occupants knew they were there. (Neighbors later reported they didn’t hear the choppers until they were on top of them.) But one of the Black Hawks lost lift upong take off, and clipped its tail on the wall of the compound. The SEALs blew it up before escaping, preventing the top-secret technology from falling into Pakistan’s hands. Or so they thought.

How a split-second stall in a top-secret chopper could lead to a new-and-improved Chinese stealth fighter and greatly alter the international arms race—in four easy steps.