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Iran has been airing its views on Argo's win at the Oscars last night. The movie tells the story of how the CIA used Hollywood to get six U.S. embassy workers out of the country during the hostage crisis of 1979.

"Argo is a movie against Iran," said the Asriran website. Asiran also claimed that the regime’s Culture Minister had been directly responsible for Iranian movie A Separation winning Best Foreign Film in 2012. The minister, Javad Shamghadri, claimed that his department had lobbied hard for the Iranian drama to win.

As well as the content of the movie, there was criticism of Michelle Obama’s role in announcing the winner. “In a rare occasion in Oscar history, the First Lady announced the winner for Best Picture for the anti-Iran film Argo, which is produced by the Zionist company Warner Bros,” said Fars News.

Ben Affleck’s acceptance speech did not escape censure, either. “After distorting history, Ben Affleck continues to show a bleak picture of Iran,” said Mehr News. “Iranians live in terrible circumstances.”

"Lincoln," "Les Miserables," "Beasts of the Southern Wild" were among this year’s Best Pic nominees. Read about the making of these and other nominated films here.

"Lincoln," "Les Miserables," "Beasts of the Southern Wild" were among this year’s Best Pic nominees. Read about the making of these and other nominated films here.

Oscar weekend! Ooooooo. Over at FC.com, we’ve awarded our own Oscars—for innovation! Innovation like HOW, you ask?

Black Swan director Darren Aronofsky's first cinematic innovation was a title. His low-budget indie was named simply, with a symbol, π. The film also asked a question dear to business innovators everywhere: Can you predict the stock market through numerology? Later films employed further innovations; for 2006's The Fountain, Aronofsky hired a specialist in macro photography to film microorganisms, using the resulting footage for the movie’s trippy visual effects. With Black Swan, Aronovsky has entered the mainstream, deploying his own form of indie dread on a wider audience. As with The Fountain, if there is a filmmaking innovation in Black Swan, it may be in restraint rather than excess. The film’s special effects are often extremely subtle—a painting seems to move, just for an instant; a tattoo squirms just a bit more than a muscle movement would account for—causing the audience members to question their own sanity at the same moment that Natalie Portman’s character questions hers.

And more! Click through to find out. If you’ve read Bazin’s What Is Cinema?, keep it to yourself. We are all about the glitz.

Oscar weekend! Ooooooo. Over at FC.com, we’ve awarded our own Oscars—for innovation! Innovation like HOW, you ask?

Black Swan director Darren Aronofsky's first cinematic innovation was a title. His low-budget indie was named simply, with a symbol, π. The film also asked a question dear to business innovators everywhere: Can you predict the stock market through numerology? Later films employed further innovations; for 2006's The Fountain, Aronofsky hired a specialist in macro photography to film microorganisms, using the resulting footage for the movie’s trippy visual effects. With Black Swan, Aronovsky has entered the mainstream, deploying his own form of indie dread on a wider audience. As with The Fountain, if there is a filmmaking innovation in Black Swan, it may be in restraint rather than excess. The film’s special effects are often extremely subtle—a painting seems to move, just for an instant; a tattoo squirms just a bit more than a muscle movement would account for—causing the audience members to question their own sanity at the same moment that Natalie Portman’s character questions hers.

And more! Click through to find out. If you’ve read Bazin’s What Is Cinema?, keep it to yourself. We are all about the glitz.