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As you may have heard, it’s hot outside. We’re hot, too.

If you’re lucky, your office has some form of air conditioning. But you’ve still got to get there without becoming a melting blob of sweat. So how do you deal with the heat? Maybe you’re thinking about wearing a little bit less, or only certain fabrics to beat the heat. That’s a fine strategy, as long as you do it right.

Let us guide you with our list of 10 things not to wear to work in the summer.

Hopefully you are enjoying your weekend and not dreading the arrival of another Monday. Here are a few tips that may make your week pleasant and productive.

Feeling a little stuck, need a boost in creativity? 
Leave your office and head to the nearest coffee shop.
No worries if you really can’t leave your desk.
You can stream these creativity-boosting coffee shop sounds.
Having trouble remembering why your work matters?
Here are some tips for finding meaning in your work.

Another way to make your work more meaningful is to…
Stay highly engaged- which will also improve the quality of your product.
Starting a new job or just want to establish yourself at your work place?
Here are three ways to be an ideal co-worker.
Do you hit productivity walls? (Are you human?) 
We do too. So we asked Fast Co. readers for their advice on staying productive throughout the day.

Have a great week y’all!

Hopefully you are enjoying your weekend and not dreading the arrival of another Monday. Here are a few tips that may make your week pleasant and productive.

Feeling a little stuck, need a boost in creativity? 

No worries if you really can’t leave your desk.

Having trouble remembering why your work matters?

Another way to make your work more meaningful is to…

Starting a new job or just want to establish yourself at your work place?

Do you hit productivity walls? (Are you human?) 

Have a great week y’all!

What’s the biggest mistake you’ve ever made (or observed) in a job interview?

The other day we wrote about 6 ways to secretly sabotage your job interview, and then we asked Facebook fans about the biggest interview mistakes they’ve ever seen. Here’s what they had to say: 
  • "Not having a convincing answer to what my strengths were." -Prashanth Challapalli
  • "When the interviewee doesn’t have a career path or salary expectation (expressing their own worth) is a turn off." - Garrett Fookes
  • "Not sending a thank you note after the interview…rookie mistake!" - The Forum: Stories That Create
  • "At the end when they say "do you have any questions" I said no. This one is a biggie." - Kathleen Stetka
  • "Sell myself short." - Milly Darby

Here, a few more. What’s the biggest interview mistake you’ve ever seen? 

Windows 8, the most radical redesign of Microsoft’s flagship operating system, is often said to be schizophrenic. On the one hand, the user interface that first greets users is beautiful: a fun, playful grid of colorful tiles, based on Microsoft’s well-received Metro design language, that offers access to apps and content. On the other hand, hidden beneath this Metro-enhanced surface is the same desktop-based UI we’ve known for decades, still riddled with taskbars, toolbars, and drop-down menus.

Today, Microsoft unveiled a preview of its latest version of Office, and like Windows 8, the newest iterations of Word, Excel, and PowerPoint are just as split-minded. With roughly one billion users worldwide, Microsoft faced the same issues designing Office as it did Windows: How do you re-imagine a ubiquitous piece of software without alienating your global user base? While Microsoft designed this latest release for mobile, engineering the experience for touch-screen devices, and infusing elements of Metro’s design language into the program, Office 15 still feels slightly dated—bogged down by decades of legacy.

What The New Microsoft Office Gets Wrong

Bosses, Stop Caring If Your Employees Are At Their Desks 

Kelly and Moen—who published their work this week in The Journal of Health and Social Behavior—found that employees who switched to ROWE took better care of themselves. Not only did they get an extra 52 minutes of sleep before workdays on average, they were also less likely to feel obligated to work when sick and more likely to see a doctor when they needed to. And the turnover rate among employees that switched to ROWE was only 6%, compared to 11% with the control group. In addition, their increased sense of schedule control and reduced work-family conflict led to increased self-reported energy levels and decreased psychological distress.

Bosses, Stop Caring If Your Employees Are At Their Desks

Kelly and Moen—who published their work this week in The Journal of Health and Social Behavior—found that employees who switched to ROWE took better care of themselves. Not only did they get an extra 52 minutes of sleep before workdays on average, they were also less likely to feel obligated to work when sick and more likely to see a doctor when they needed to. And the turnover rate among employees that switched to ROWE was only 6%, compared to 11% with the control group. In addition, their increased sense of schedule control and reduced work-family conflict led to increased self-reported energy levels and decreased psychological distress.