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Anemia, a condition of low red blood cells, is primarily caused by deficiency of iron. A whopping 44% of Cambodians suffer from anemia, including two-thirds of the country’s entire population of children. At the same time, about 70% of Cambodians live on less than $1 a day, pushing iron supplements (or red meat) far out of reach.

Chris Charles, then a University of Guelph PhD student, traveled to Cambodia to tackle the problem, he had a crucial resource at hand: a study showing that simply adding iron to food while cooking could increase iron levels in the blood. 

That’s where this lucky iron fish comes in.

One Innovation By Design entrant is Hello Compost, a proposed program in which low-income families will be able exchange compost for produce credits.

“We need to re-imagine the role of food waste from being a smelly, unattractive side effect of eating to an attractive resource for residents to positively impact their community and to help put fresh food on the table,” says cofounder Aly Blenkin.

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Did you finish all those chips at lunch (even though you vowed to only have half)? Here’s why.
The Extraordinary Science of Addictive Junkfood

"So why are the diabetes and obesity and hypertension numbers still spiraling out of control? It’s not just a matter of poor willpower on the part of the consumer and a give-the-people-what-they-want attitude on the part of the food manufacturers. 
What I found, over four years of research and reporting, was a conscious effort — taking place in labs and marketing meetings and grocery-store aisles — to get people hooked on foods that are convenient and inexpensive.”

Check out the full NY Times article here.

Did you finish all those chips at lunch (even though you vowed to only have half)? Here’s why.

The Extraordinary Science of Addictive Junkfood

"So why are the diabetes and obesity and hypertension numbers still spiraling out of control? It’s not just a matter of poor willpower on the part of the consumer and a give-the-people-what-they-want attitude on the part of the food manufacturers.

What I found, over four years of research and reporting, was a conscious effort — taking place in labs and marketing meetings and grocery-store aisles — to get people hooked on foods that are convenient and inexpensive.”

Check out the full NY Times article here.