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Using geostationary satellite location and a basic knowledge of 777 specs, can we predict the likely locations of MH370? Read more>

Using geostationary satellite location and a basic knowledge of 777 specs, can we predict the likely locations of MH370? Read more>

This is the new HTC One. 

So what’s new about it?
At first glance it looks awfully similar to the old one, no? There are quite a few hardware differences once you spend some time with it, though. The screen is a little bigger (5.0 inches versus 4.7 inches) and its all-metal body has a little more heft to it. During a pre-briefing, the phone felt very sturdy. Solid. “This year with the HTC One we really wanted to double down on what was working very well on that design, which was about 70% metal,” Scott Croyle, HTC senior vice president of design, told Fast Company. “We’re actually able to get 90% metal now… all the way around to the front housing. It creates fewer breaks and a purer design.”

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The American political atmosphere might be polarized when it comes to climate change, but new evidence suggests that the public is more passionate about energy’s impact on the environment than one might think.

A new survey from the University of Michigan Energy Institute found that 60% of respondents worried “a great deal” or a “fair amount” about the environmental impact of energy use. By comparison, 55% worried a great deal or fair amount about energy affordability. The two concerns, researchers say, were basically equivalent.

"That was an eye opener for us," says professor John DeCicco. “I wouldn’t have guessed that we would have gotten, statistically speaking, an equally strong response.” More>

An Airbnb guest used a Manhattan apartment to hold a sex party last week. Here’s how the company prepared a rapid response to the situation. Read more>

An Airbnb guest used a Manhattan apartment to hold a sex party last week. Here’s how the company prepared a rapid response to the situation. Read more>

According to the official narrative, monitoring metadata is no big deal. But two Stanford University researchers wanted to see how “sensitive” metadata actually was. So they enlisted hundreds of volunteers to install an app called “MetaPhone” on their Androids to pick up that metadata over several months. What they found shocked them.

"Participants had calls with Alcoholics Anonymous, gun stores, sexually transmitted disease clinics, strip clubs, and much more.

The NSA Can Learn All Your Secrets From Your Phone Metadata