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This week, the home page of the NYTimes.com featured an unusual, wonderful Op-Doc called “A Short History of the Highrise.” Billed as an “interactive documentary,” the project was a collaboration between the Times and the National Film Board of Canada.

With influences ranging from traditional documentary to video games to the tablet experience, “A Short History of the Highrise” is a digital publishing rabbit hole. A casual viewer can consume the film in a few minutes, while the obsessive can delve deep into supplemental content for hours. Fast Company caught up with the project’s Emmy Award-winning director, Katerina Cizek, to learn more about how the documentary form is being transformed in a digital age.

fastcodesign:

Reporting the first official election results from Dixville Notch, New Hampshire, is an Election Day tradition. The tiny town is a novel bellwether for the rest of the country, and this morning, the town reported a perfect tie, with five votes for Obama and five for Romney. If a ten-person town can be any indication, we’re in for a long day.
Thanks to the Internet, we’ve got dozens of ways to watch the results roll in. Parsing the hundreds of scenarios that could unfold today is a more complicated proposition. But The New York Times does a beautiful job with this bracket interactive, leading us through the 431 discrete paths to the White House open to Obama, and the 76 paths open to Romney. Designed by Mike Bostock and Shan Carter, it’s the most illuminating election graphic we’ve seen around the web. 

fastcodesign:

Reporting the first official election results from Dixville Notch, New Hampshire, is an Election Day tradition. The tiny town is a novel bellwether for the rest of the country, and this morning, the town reported a perfect tie, with five votes for Obama and five for Romney. If a ten-person town can be any indication, we’re in for a long day.

Thanks to the Internet, we’ve got dozens of ways to watch the results roll in. Parsing the hundreds of scenarios that could unfold today is a more complicated proposition. But The New York Times does a beautiful job with this bracket interactive, leading us through the 431 discrete paths to the White House open to Obama, and the 76 paths open to Romney. Designed by Mike Bostock and Shan Carter, it’s the most illuminating election graphic we’ve seen around the web. 

(via fastcodesign)

Why Is the New York Times Partnering With Shell Oil? 

The New York Times often covers Shell Oil’s misdeeds and questionable choices, which in past years have included drilling in the arctic and denying human rights abuses in Nigeria. The oil industry is undeniably contentious and filled with scandals and coverups—all the more reason for the Times to write about it. But how can the Times remain objective when it is partnering with Shell Oil on an energy conference?
Shell is teaming up with the Times (as a media partner) for its 2011 Energy Summit next  month in Houston, Texas. The summit will reportedly feature a keynote  address from Bill Richardson, the former Governor of New Mexico, as well  as an “intimate conversation” with former Times columnist  Frank Rich and an inside look at Shell’s Eco-Marathon, which challenges  high school and college students to build energy-efficient vehicles.

Why Is the New York Times Partnering With Shell Oil?

The New York Times often covers Shell Oil’s misdeeds and questionable choices, which in past years have included drilling in the arctic and denying human rights abuses in Nigeria. The oil industry is undeniably contentious and filled with scandals and coverups—all the more reason for the Times to write about it. But how can the Times remain objective when it is partnering with Shell Oil on an energy conference?

Shell is teaming up with the Times (as a media partner) for its 2011 Energy Summit next month in Houston, Texas. The summit will reportedly feature a keynote address from Bill Richardson, the former Governor of New Mexico, as well as an “intimate conversation” with former Times columnist Frank Rich and an inside look at Shell’s Eco-Marathon, which challenges high school and college students to build energy-efficient vehicles.