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NASA engineer Jerry Budd has an idea so audacious that it might just work—he wants to use unmanned, autonomous gliders to send small, low-cost satellites into orbit.

The Towed Glider Air-Launch is an experimental project (still awaiting government approval) that would fire air-launching rocket boosters from a drone glider. In Budd’s modest words, the proposal offers “affordable, flexible access to space.” A glider would be towed into high altitudes by military transport aircraft on planned flights and would be released by the plane—the glider would then fire a rocket booster (with a satellite enclosed) into orbit. Afterward, pilots located in remote NASA facilities safely guide the glider home.

The space gliders would be used to launch cubesats into orbit. Cubesats are small, low-cost satellites that weigh under 200 pounds and can be built and sent into orbit for low cost. Right now, it costs about $50,000 to build a cubesat and $100,000 to put one in orbit. Budd’s proposal would sharply reduce the cost of sending cubesats into space by allowing specialized drones to handle much of the hard work. Instead of sending cubesats into orbit on Russian rockets, NASA could build a new revenue stream by shipping these small satellites into orbit for other entities—effectively meaning the agency would provide space logistics services.

bobbycaputo:


A beautiful death
When a star like our sun uses up all of the hydrogen in its core, it becomes what is called a “planetary nebula.” The star sheds its outer layers of gas, leaving behind a hot core.
This composite image of NGC 2392 includes data from NASA’s Chandra Space Telescope, showing the location of million-degree gas near the center of the planetary nebula in pink. Readings from the Hubble Space Telescope - colored red, green, and blue - show the intricate pattern of the outer layers of the star that have been ejected.

bobbycaputo:

A beautiful death

When a star like our sun uses up all of the hydrogen in its core, it becomes what is called a “planetary nebula.” The star sheds its outer layers of gas, leaving behind a hot core.

This composite image of NGC 2392 includes data from NASA’s Chandra Space Telescope, showing the location of million-degree gas near the center of the planetary nebula in pink. Readings from the Hubble Space Telescope - colored red, green, and blue - show the intricate pattern of the outer layers of the star that have been ejected.

(Source: photoblog.nbcnews.com)

Happy Birthday NASA! 
pbsthisdayinhistory:

July 29, 1958: NASA is Created
On this day in 1958, the United States Congress passed legislation creating the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). Since its creation, NASA has played a vital role in coordinating all of the US’ activity in space. The agency spearheads and sponsors space exhibitions and has launched numerous orbiting satellites that have produced information about the solar system and universe.
In recent years, many feel that NASA has experienced numerous setbacks. The most significant being the end of the space shuttle program in 2011.
Celebrate NASA’s birthday with PBS NewsHour’s video of the agency’s newest vehicle “Curiosity.”
photo:Astronaut Edward H. White II’s Space Walk on Gemini IV ca.1965, (NASA)

Happy Birthday NASA! 

pbsthisdayinhistory:

July 29, 1958: NASA is Created

On this day in 1958, the United States Congress passed legislation creating the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). Since its creation, NASA has played a vital role in coordinating all of the US’ activity in space. The agency spearheads and sponsors space exhibitions and has launched numerous orbiting satellites that have produced information about the solar system and universe.

In recent years, many feel that NASA has experienced numerous setbacks. The most significant being the end of the space shuttle program in 2011.

Celebrate NASA’s birthday with PBS NewsHour’s video of the agency’s newest vehicle “Curiosity.”

photo:Astronaut Edward H. White II’s Space Walk on Gemini IV ca.1965, (NASA)

(via latimes)

Boldly 3-D printing where no one has 3-D printed before.

Planetary Resources, the innovative, bold company with plans to strip-mine asteroids for their valuable resources, has revealed it will use advanced 3-D printing techniques to produce its line of Arkyd space telescopes.

And NASA just successfully test-fired a rocket engine that uses a 3-D printed injector component. The advantage of 3-D printing this part is the speed and precision of the process, which NASA notes would otherwise have required a year of careful machining to makeIt doesn’t hurt that it also cost 70% less to produce…

Daily Fast Feed Roundup
Hi Tumblr! Here’s a quick rundown of what you need to know today: 
Rejoice! Google has brought back the ability to make calls from Gmail. 
BlackBerryhas lost its battle with Indian authorities, who have been demanding that it let them spy on users in order to protect the state and prevent terrorism.
Apple has been found guilty of conspiring with five major book publishers to artificially raise e-book prices. 
Today’s Most Innovative Company is NASA, which is planning to send a new rover to Mars in 2020.
Today’s Most Creative People are the students behind NASA’s awesome Grover rover. 
A code found buried in the iOS 7 beta is a clue that the new iPhone may have a slow motion camera.
A new, more accurate clock that uses lasers to help tell time may change our definition of the second.
Ever trekked all the way to a cafe just to find out that their Wi-fi is lousy? Now you can avoid that inconvenience using the SeedSpot app, which lets you test the Wi-Fi networks in your area.
Google just cleaned up the Android Maps app, giving it a sleeker, more useable design.
Hackers are taking advantage of Microsoft’s security flaw, which was announced earlier this year by a Google employee. 
Have a great day!
—M. Cecelia Bittner and Jessica Hullinger

[Image: flattop341]

Daily Fast Feed Roundup

Hi Tumblr! Here’s a quick rundown of what you need to know today: 

  • BlackBerryhas lost its battle with Indian authorities, who have been demanding that it let them spy on users in order to protect the state and prevent terrorism.

Have a great day!

M. Cecelia Bittner and Jessica Hullinger

[Image: flattop341]