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Fast Company senior editor Jason Feifer has strong opinions. Many, many strong opinions.
But he isn’t just some maniac howling at the moon. He’s our maniac howling at the moon—and he’s really smart and often makes very good points. To wit: As part of our new show, The 29th Floor, Jason very persuasively expresses why it’s so important to delete the free U2 album that Apple recently uploaded to customers’ iTunes as part of an iPhone 6 promotional push. Take it away, Jason! After you watch the above vid, it’s your turn: tweet about ditching the tracks, and tell us all about it with hashtag #LeaveMeAlone.
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Fast Company senior editor Jason Feifer has strong opinionsManymany strong opinions.

But he isn’t just some maniac howling at the moon. He’s our maniac howling at the moon—and he’s really smart and often makes very good points. To wit: As part of our new show, The 29th Floor, Jason very persuasively expresses why it’s so important to delete the free U2 album that Apple recently uploaded to customers’ iTunes as part of an iPhone 6 promotional push. Take it away, Jason! After you watch the above vid, it’s your turn: tweet about ditching the tracks, and tell us all about it with hashtag #LeaveMeAlone.

Watch>

What Spotify and Echo Nest know about listener behavior is about to change the music industry.
Music’s shift to an all-you-can-stream model is convenient for listeners, tough for many artists, and potentially lucrative for the tech companies involved. It also has a hidden perk that could benefit all of them: Data. Lots of it.
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What Spotify and Echo Nest know about listener behavior is about to change the music industry.

Music’s shift to an all-you-can-stream model is convenient for listeners, tough for many artists, and potentially lucrative for the tech companies involved. It also has a hidden perk that could benefit all of them: Data. Lots of it.

Read More>

Summer 2014 is officially dead. Nobody seems upset about that, because it was a weird one. For the first time in all of human history, there was no official Song of the Summer (stop trying to make “Fancy” happen). A movie featuring a talking raccoon made over half a billion dollars, and you loved it. Famous people poured ice buckets on stuff. As the empty calories of summer entertainment recede into the rearview, however, we welcome a far more nourishing batch of creativity. Fall is a time for Oscar bait, the return of TV, and an unwieldy number of must-listen albums dropping on the same Tuesday. In order to help cut through the clutter, Co.Create has prepared a guide to the most promising movies, shows, albums, tours, and other fun stuff coming your way in September. If you somehow manage to get bored with all these options available, well, you should be ashamed of yourself.
Read More>

Summer 2014 is officially dead. Nobody seems upset about that, because it was a weird one. For the first time in all of human history, there was no official Song of the Summer (stop trying to make “Fancy” happen). A movie featuring a talking raccoon made over half a billion dollars, and you loved it. Famous people poured ice buckets on stuff. As the empty calories of summer entertainment recede into the rearview, however, we welcome a far more nourishing batch of creativity. Fall is a time for Oscar bait, the return of TV, and an unwieldy number of must-listen albums dropping on the same Tuesday. In order to help cut through the clutter, Co.Create has prepared a guide to the most promising movies, shows, albums, tours, and other fun stuff coming your way in September. If you somehow manage to get bored with all these options available, well, you should be ashamed of yourself.

Read More>

The CEO of JoyTunes, a music-learning app, is now giving away his product to the 40 of its previously paying customers who use it most.

Sacrificing 40% of your profits? It’s certainly a leap of faith. But Kaminka—and his investors—feel that to do otherwise would be to miss out on a big opportunity. “This technological trend happening now in music education means for me that I can be dominant here. Someone will take over and be the standard, and that’s the opportunity for JoyTunes,” says Kaminka. It’s not merely a question of grabbing the most market share, either, he suggests. He thinks that by making JoyTunes more broadly accessible, he can actually grow the market of digital music learning in its entirety.

Read More>

The CEO of JoyTunes, a music-learning app, is now giving away his product to the 40 of its previously paying customers who use it most.

Sacrificing 40% of your profits? It’s certainly a leap of faith. But Kaminka—and his investors—feel that to do otherwise would be to miss out on a big opportunity. “This technological trend happening now in music education means for me that I can be dominant here. Someone will take over and be the standard, and that’s the opportunity for JoyTunes,” says Kaminka. It’s not merely a question of grabbing the most market share, either, he suggests. He thinks that by making JoyTunes more broadly accessible, he can actually grow the market of digital music learning in its entirety.

Read More>