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We Tried To Design Our Own Iron Man Suit. It Wasn’t Always Pretty
The U.S. military’s TALOS armor, slated to debut this month, will certainly be really, really cool. But will it fly or shoot lasers?!
Back in February, while announcing two new Pentagon-sponsored manufacturing hubs in Chicago and Detroit, President Obama made a joke. “Basically,” he said, “I’m here to announce that we’re building Iron Man.”
There was, of course, a kernel of truth to this: The Army is working on an Iron Man suit, called the Tactical Assault Light Operator Suit, or TALOS for short. Built by DARPA, the robotic exoskeleton is designed to be worn under a soldier’s standard fatigues, increasing his or her strength, improving stamina, and offering limited protection from enemy gunfire. It looks pretty badass, too.
Which is all fine and good! But as any fair-weather superhero fan knows, TALOS is still a far cry from Tony Stark's canonical closet of Iron Man armors. So, we decided to take a look at some of the other real-life technologies being developed today to try and build something an avenging superhero might—or might not—actually want to wear. (Keyword: “try.”)
How would it fly? What would its helmet do? What would even power the thing?
So we asked around. We talked with experts, dug around, and surveyed the current landscape of forward-thinking technologies available. We tried to build our own Iron Man.
And, well, uh, this is what we came up with:
Read More>

We Tried To Design Our Own Iron Man Suit. It Wasn’t Always Pretty

The U.S. military’s TALOS armor, slated to debut this month, will certainly be really, really cool. But will it fly or shoot lasers?!

Back in February, while announcing two new Pentagon-sponsored manufacturing hubs in Chicago and Detroit, President Obama made a joke. “Basically,” he said, “I’m here to announce that we’re building Iron Man.”

There was, of course, a kernel of truth to this: The Army is working on an Iron Man suit, called the Tactical Assault Light Operator Suit, or TALOS for short. Built by DARPA, the robotic exoskeleton is designed to be worn under a soldier’s standard fatigues, increasing his or her strength, improving stamina, and offering limited protection from enemy gunfire. It looks pretty badass, too.

Which is all fine and good! But as any fair-weather superhero fan knows, TALOS is still a far cry from Tony Stark's canonical closet of Iron Man armors. So, we decided to take a look at some of the other real-life technologies being developed today to try and build something an avenging superhero might—or might not—actually want to wear. (Keyword: “try.”)

How would it fly? What would its helmet do? What would even power the thing?

So we asked around. We talked with experts, dug around, and surveyed the current landscape of forward-thinking technologies available. We tried to build our own Iron Man.

And, well, uh, this is what we came up with:

Read More>

Here’s one leadership lessons from a Navy SEAL commander:
Survival is not about who’s the strongest or fastest, but who can best adapt to change. Navy SEAL’s are masters of adaptation, being able to operate in jungle, desert or arctic conditions. In comparison, CEOs must adapt to the ever-changing market conditions they face daily and should train their staff to do the same.
Here’s more.

Here’s one leadership lessons from a Navy SEAL commander:

Survival is not about who’s the strongest or fastest, but who can best adapt to change. Navy SEAL’s are masters of adaptation, being able to operate in jungle, desert or arctic conditions. In comparison, CEOs must adapt to the ever-changing market conditions they face daily and should train their staff to do the same.

Here’s more.

On September 27, DARPA will hold a workshop to flesh out the government cyberwar strategy called “Plan X.” The one day workshop consists of a general access session for government employees and contractors, along with a Secret-clearance and above closed session to draw a roadmap for the future of America’s cyberwar forces.
While the next great virus won’t be proposed at the Plan X workshop, the Defense Department’s cyberarmy infrastructure development plans (and the sweet government contracts that go with it) will. According to the Washington Post's Ellen Nakashima, Plan X has received $110 million in funding for the next five years.
Inside DARPA’s “Plan X” For Cyberwar

On September 27, DARPA will hold a workshop to flesh out the government cyberwar strategy called “Plan X.” The one day workshop consists of a general access session for government employees and contractors, along with a Secret-clearance and above closed session to draw a roadmap for the future of America’s cyberwar forces.

While the next great virus won’t be proposed at the Plan X workshop, the Defense Department’s cyberarmy infrastructure development plans (and the sweet government contracts that go with it) will. According to the Washington Post's Ellen Nakashima, Plan X has received $110 million in funding for the next five years.

Inside DARPA’s “Plan X” For Cyberwar

A giant defense contractor and a special effects giant have launched a virtual world where players can even feel when they’re shot. 

Participants also feel pain when injured; two muscle stimulators attached to the triceps administer electric shocks when a user is “shot.” Users can continue to play with non-fatal injuries, but head or chest shots immediately remove them from the training exercise. The electric shock is comparable to one encountered in physical therapy, says Raytheon’s Ellen Houlihan.

Sorry, cops only.
Virtual Training World For Law Enforcement Inflicts Real Pain

A giant defense contractor and a special effects giant have launched a virtual world where players can even feel when they’re shot. 

Participants also feel pain when injured; two muscle stimulators attached to the triceps administer electric shocks when a user is “shot.” Users can continue to play with non-fatal injuries, but head or chest shots immediately remove them from the training exercise. The electric shock is comparable to one encountered in physical therapy, says Raytheon’s Ellen Houlihan.

Sorry, cops only.

Virtual Training World For Law Enforcement Inflicts Real Pain

These are some of my favorite images from the new book Soldier Dogs. There are more pictures in our slideshow today.

Military Working Dogs play a crucial part in America’s armed services. The best known “Soldier Dog,” Cairo, put crucial canine skills to work in the SEAL Team Six operation that killed Osama Bin Laden. Other Military Working Dogs serve as everything from bomb sniffers to troop companions to search and rescue dogs (and also serve in darker roles, such as duty at Guantanamo Bay). Their handlers and trainers, devoted dog lovers down to a man, form an unusually close-knit fraternity within the military.

Soldier Dogs: The Four-Legged Heroes Of Iraq And Afghanistan

DigitalGlobe, the firm that provides much of the imagery for Google Earth, is launching a next-generation satellite in 2014. However, the super-sharp images of the WorldView-3 aren’t for Google and Bing Maps: They’re going straight to the military and intelligence agencies.

DigitalGlobe, the firm that provides much of the imagery for Google Earth, is launching a next-generation satellite in 2014. However, the super-sharp images of the WorldView-3 aren’t for Google and Bing Maps: They’re going straight to the military and intelligence agencies.