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Two Words: Cat Cafés!
They’re all the rage in Japan. Seriously.

Many people were there, their focus directed exclusively to one cat or  another. They held them on their laps, sat beside them, stroked, patted,  and murmured sweet nothings in their ears. All the while, the cats  purred the deep purrs of creatures entirely satisfied with their lots in  life. After a cup of coffee and brief interactions with three separate  cats, my time was up, and I could now say I’d had the full cat café  experience.

Read more…

Two Words: Cat Cafés!

They’re all the rage in Japan. Seriously.

Many people were there, their focus directed exclusively to one cat or another. They held them on their laps, sat beside them, stroked, patted, and murmured sweet nothings in their ears. All the while, the cats purred the deep purrs of creatures entirely satisfied with their lots in life. After a cup of coffee and brief interactions with three separate cats, my time was up, and I could now say I’d had the full cat café experience.

Read more…


Most of the stuff we do every day happens in patterns, like how we shop. You probably have never given it so much as a thought, but the chances are you enter the supermarket and then navigate the aisles in a counter-clockwise direction. It’s been designed that way. Data compiled in a study for my new book Brandwashed surveyed 200 stores revealing that shoppers who move counter clockwise spend $2 more per shopping trip than those who wheel their trolleys in the opposite direction. Human beings are naturally more inclined to move to the left (because it’s easier to reach out with our right arm to grab whatever it is we need), so a right-side entryway is a subtle yet effective means of ensuring a counter-clockwise shopping flow.

PS Keep your right hand in your pocket the next time you go shopping – it may save you $2!

http://www.martinlindstrom.com/brandwashed/more-info.php

Inspired by the 2010 Hollywood movie The Joneses, about a family of stealth marketers who move into an upper-middle-class neighborhood to peddle their wares to their unsuspecting neighbors, Martin Lindstrom spent eight weeks filming a “real” family in unscripted situations, from barbecues to shopping expeditions and documented how their circle of friends responded to specific brands and products.