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The Supreme Court ruled today that the Defense of Marriage Act, which prevents the federal government from recognizing gay marriages granted by states, was unconstitutional because it “singles out a class of persons deemed by a State entitled ot recognition and protection to enhance their own liberty.”
It also declined to uphold Proposition 8, making same-sex marriage legal in California. 
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The Supreme Court ruled today that the Defense of Marriage Act, which prevents the federal government from recognizing gay marriages granted by states, was unconstitutional because it “singles out a class of persons deemed by a State entitled ot recognition and protection to enhance their own liberty.”

It also declined to uphold Proposition 8, making same-sex marriage legal in California. 

More

A nationally representative scientific sample of over 19,000 married and divorced people found that almost 35% of couples who married between 2005 and 2012 originally met each other online. The couples who met online were less likely to divorce, even after controlling for age, education, income, and race. Meeting over the web was also independently correlated with higher levels of marital satisfaction.
Interestingly, it matters where a couple first meets: in the wholesome, well-lit hotel ballrooms of Match.com and eHarmony? The banal, crowded corridors of Facebook?
This study says a lot about the different kinds of “neighborhoods” that people frequent online. Read more
[Image: Flickr user Patrik Jones]

A nationally representative scientific sample of over 19,000 married and divorced people found that almost 35% of couples who married between 2005 and 2012 originally met each other online. The couples who met online were less likely to divorce, even after controlling for age, education, income, and race. Meeting over the web was also independently correlated with higher levels of marital satisfaction.

Interestingly, it matters where a couple first meets: in the wholesome, well-lit hotel ballrooms of Match.com and eHarmony? The banal, crowded corridors of Facebook?

This study says a lot about the different kinds of “neighborhoods” that people frequent online. Read more

[Image: Flickr user Patrik Jones]

Here are some of the 23 Most Creative Marriage Equality Facebook Pictures

Last week, as the Supreme Court heard arguments about whether it should legalize gay marriage, the Human Rights Campaignreleased a new version of its classic logo. While it’s normally a yellow equals sign on a blue background, this new logo was a white on red. The HRC encouraged people to change their Facebook avatars to their logo to show their support for the cause.

This being the Internet, however, people weren’t content to merely use the HRC’s logo in its original form. Quickly, new versions began popping up. Some were merely more artfully drawn equals symbols, but many more were humorous takes on the gay marriage debate, from popular maybe gay couples (Bert and Ernie, C3P0 and R2D2) to Internet memes (Grumpy Cat) to historic bits of cultural literacy that just happen to look like an equals sign (Mark Rothko). We’ve collected a gallery of some of our favorites above. 

Here’s more.

Infographic of the Day: Why Do Marriages Fall Apart?

 
Based on the annual report by The National Marriage Project, it paints a picture of marriage becoming a less and less relevant factor in the way American’s live and raise children. The short version: Marriage is simply shrinking as a cultural value; where 66% of women over 15 were married in 1960, the figure has shrunk every decade since.* Now, it’s just 51%:

 
(via Co. Design)

Infographic of the Day: Why Do Marriages Fall Apart?

Based on the annual report by The National Marriage Project, it paints a picture of marriage becoming a less and less relevant factor in the way American’s live and raise children. The short version: Marriage is simply shrinking as a cultural value; where 66% of women over 15 were married in 1960, the figure has shrunk every decade since.* Now, it’s just 51%:

(via Co. Design)