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Sterling Cooper and Partners is an agency whose reputation is built on a progressive approach to advertising. So it has made sense, throughout the last few seasons, to see Herman Miller’s mid-century aesthetic seep into the offices designed by Mad Men’s set decorator Claudette Didul-Mann. An Eames Time-Life chair shows up in Roger’s office; Don gets an Aluminum Group chair. And for good reason. Herman Miller helps to visually represent the cultural evolution at the heart of Mad Men.
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Sterling Cooper and Partners is an agency whose reputation is built on a progressive approach to advertising. So it has made sense, throughout the last few seasons, to see Herman Miller’s mid-century aesthetic seep into the offices designed by Mad Men’s set decorator Claudette Didul-Mann. An Eames Time-Life chair shows up in Roger’s office; Don gets an Aluminum Group chair. And for good reason. Herman Miller helps to visually represent the cultural evolution at the heart of Mad Men.

Read More>

“We made a decision the very first season—spoiler alert!—when Don was on the train and the guy calls him Dick Whitman; there was a conversation in the room that Don would take this guy and walk him towards the smoking car to have a drink or conversation and push him off the train. It would have been a very interesting show but I said, ‘Don Draper doesn’t kill people.’”
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We made a decision the very first season—spoiler alert!—when Don was on the train and the guy calls him Dick Whitman; there was a conversation in the room that Don would take this guy and walk him towards the smoking car to have a drink or conversation and push him off the train. It would have been a very interesting show but I said, ‘Don Draper doesn’t kill people.’

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“There are definitely fictional families that I’ve almost felt like a part of,” says Kirk Demarais, the artist responsible for a series of portraits of fictitious families plucked from pop culture. “The Brady Bunch is first to come to mind. Thanks to endless repeats of those 117 episodes, my brain was practically fooled into thinking I was growing up alongside Greg Brady and the gang.”

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Apatow brought a sense of structure and pacing, and, according to Dunham, “the most emotional, connected, what most people might think of as the most feminine content. You’ll watch it and go, ‘The hand-job joke was Judd’s; that crying girl was Lena’s.’ Well, flip it. I just brought my desire to share my shame with the world.” She also felt her sensibility addressed an underserved voice—confused New York women bridging the Gossip Girl teens and Sex in the City career women.

Are you watching the premiere of “Girls” tonight? Okay, maybe after ”Mad Men”?

(Source: fastcocreate.com)

As “Mad Men” moves further into the 1960s, Jennifer Getzinger, who directed tonight’s two-hour season premiere, hints at changes—in characters, sets, and of course, costumes—to come this season.

"We put so much time and care and love into the design of these sets and the design of these clothes and the hair and these people that the frame is going to look full and rich. You don’t have to do some fancy camera move to try to add some excitement. So we try to really let things play in very classic ways. It is about finding these great graphic frames. There are so many amazing lines in the design of the sets. Especially the office. But a lot of [our] sets have that. We shoot a little lower [than most television shows] and so we always have ceilings—fantastic ceilings—so you can get these really beautiful, graphic shots. You’d be surprised how many sets don’t have ceilings."

Read on->

As “Mad Men” moves further into the 1960s, Jennifer Getzinger, who directed tonight’s two-hour season premiere, hints at changes—in characters, sets, and of course, costumes—to come this season.

"We put so much time and care and love into the design of these sets and the design of these clothes and the hair and these people that the frame is going to look full and rich. You don’t have to do some fancy camera move to try to add some excitement. So we try to really let things play in very classic ways. It is about finding these great graphic frames. There are so many amazing lines in the design of the sets. Especially the office. But a lot of [our] sets have that. We shoot a little lower [than most television shows] and so we always have ceilings—fantastic ceilings—so you can get these really beautiful, graphic shots. You’d be surprised how many sets don’t have ceilings."

Read on->