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For one month, I became the “micro-entrepreneur” touted by companies like TaskRabbit, Postmates, and Airbnb. Instead of the labor revolution I had been promised, all I found was hard work, low pay, and a system that puts workers at a disadvantage. Read more>

For one month, I became the “micro-entrepreneur” touted by companies like TaskRabbit, Postmates, and Airbnb. Instead of the labor revolution I had been promised, all I found was hard work, low pay, and a system that puts workers at a disadvantage. Read more>

I can picture Steve [Jobs] running into the Macintosh design group and saying really excitedly, ‘We’ve got this fantastic concept.’ His idea was that a nontechnical secretary should be able to go into a room alone with a Mac in a box and a letter opener and be doing useful work in one hour.

Our new book, Design Crazy, tells the story of how some of the most iconic Apple designs came about. It’s a great weekend read, and it’s in the iTunes store for $1.99!

All of the wonks were saying the personal computer was dead. And then one day—you never quite knew where Steve would get his ideas, because he would sometimes lay claim to others’ ideas as his own—Steve woke up and decided not only was the computer not dead, but it was more important than ever. The computer was the center of this ecosystem and there were spokes: pictures, work, music.

The story behind the iPod’s design

"I designed the boot image-a happy Mac-because we wanted the computer to be friendly. That was a word we tossed around a lot. The icon was inspired by those yellow smiley-face buttons, of course, and by the kind of things I used to draw when I was fourteen years old. We did the happy Mac, and then we did the unhappy Mac, which was never supposed to be seen. You know, like the bomb.”

Our new book, “Design Crazy," is the first oral history of Apple design, as told by the designers who were there. It’s fascinating. Check it out.

People. Colors. Apps. Cats. Bacon. Organic. Bieber. Mobile. Social. Local. Pivot. In other words, Bill Nguyen’s startup history embodies every web 2.0 cliché, EVER.
"I make the same mistakes with every single startup," says Nguyen, "But I keep trying. Maybe I’m the Don Quixote of startups."
So who is this guy who thought he could build a better Facebook, and why do people keep giving him so much money?
A fantastic long read from our November issue: Bill Nguyen: The Boy In The Bubble

People. Colors. Apps. Cats. Bacon. Organic. Bieber. Mobile. Social. Local. Pivot. In other words, Bill Nguyen’s startup history embodies every web 2.0 cliché, EVER.

"I make the same mistakes with every single startup," says Nguyen, "But I keep trying. Maybe I’m the Don Quixote of startups."

So who is this guy who thought he could build a better Facebook, and why do people keep giving him so much money?

A fantastic long read from our November issue: Bill Nguyen: The Boy In The Bubble