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Happy National Dog Day!

Bull Dog. The company bully; the manager or employee who gossips and demeans other employees for his or her own enjoyment and advancement.

Puppy. This is the overly enthusiastic intern or administrative assistant who continually pops out of nowhere to be of help. This person means well but occasionally needs to be crated.

Leg Humper. The sexual harasser who comes in many ages and forms but still does not realize his (or her) sexual come-ons and innuendos are not welcome. Or legal.

Do any of the people in your office who may have these dog-like qualities? Here are a few more that may sound familiar.

Happy National Dog Day! Here are a few tips for a productive week that will hopefully have you feeling as happy as this guy! 
The 30-minute strategy for creating a successful path to your goals
5, like, totally awesome public speaking lessons from college admissions guides to use at work
6 simple rituals to reach your potential every day
Have a great week!

Happy National Dog DayHere are a few tips for a productive week that will hopefully have you feeling as happy as this guy! 

Have a great week!

I think tackling my fear is important, because it makes me present and accountable to myself, and keeps me living a meaningful life by testing my limits and my potential. We have no idea what we’re capable of achieving unless we try things and stretch the limits in our minds.

How one entrepreneur faced his biggest fears and found hard-fought success
Here’s one leadership lessons from a Navy SEAL commander:
Survival is not about who’s the strongest or fastest, but who can best adapt to change. Navy SEAL’s are masters of adaptation, being able to operate in jungle, desert or arctic conditions. In comparison, CEOs must adapt to the ever-changing market conditions they face daily and should train their staff to do the same.
Here’s more.

Here’s one leadership lessons from a Navy SEAL commander:

Survival is not about who’s the strongest or fastest, but who can best adapt to change. Navy SEAL’s are masters of adaptation, being able to operate in jungle, desert or arctic conditions. In comparison, CEOs must adapt to the ever-changing market conditions they face daily and should train their staff to do the same.

Here’s more.

Introverts (or those of us with introverted tendencies) tend to recharge by spending time alone. They lose energy from being around people for long periods of time, particularly large crowds.
Extroverts, on the other hand, gain energy from other people. Extroverts actually find their energy is sapped when they spend too much time alone. They recharge by being social.
Are you an introvert or an extrovert? And what does it mean for your career?

Introverts (or those of us with introverted tendencies) tend to recharge by spending time alone. They lose energy from being around people for long periods of time, particularly large crowds.

Extroverts, on the other hand, gain energy from other people. Extroverts actually find their energy is sapped when they spend too much time alone. They recharge by being social.

Are you an introvert or an extrovert? And what does it mean for your career?

Elmore Leonard, the recently deceased author of 45 novels, including Get Shorty, Hombre, Swag,Raylan, and Glitz (he died at work on his 46th), was reluctant to write about his own writing. But back in 2001 the New York Times convinced him to make a list of his 10 writing rules:
1. Never use the words ”suddenly” or ”all hell broke loose.”Leonard writes that this rule doesn’t even require an explanation.
2. Use regional dialect, patois sparingly.“Once you start,” writes Leonard, “you won’t be able to stop.”
3. Avoid detailed descriptions of characters.Leonard cites a Hemingway short story in which the only physical description of a couple introduced as the ”American and the girl with him” is: ”She had taken off her hat and put it on the table.” Enough said.
More writing rules 

Elmore Leonard, the recently deceased author of 45 novels, including Get Shorty, Hombre, Swag,Raylan, and Glitz (he died at work on his 46th), was reluctant to write about his own writing. But back in 2001 the New York Times convinced him to make a list of his 10 writing rules:

1. Never use the words ”suddenly” or ”all hell broke loose.”
Leonard writes that this rule doesn’t even require an explanation.

2. Use regional dialect, patois sparingly.
“Once you start,” writes Leonard, “you won’t be able to stop.”

3. Avoid detailed descriptions of characters.
Leonard cites a Hemingway short story in which the only physical description of a couple introduced as the ”American and the girl with him” is: ”She had taken off her hat and put it on the table.” Enough said.

More writing rules 

With an experiment, you run a test and see what the results are. If you don’t get good results, you can try another option, and run another test. Then you can see what the outcomes of the choices are (the info you didn’t have when first thinking about the decision), and you can make a better-informed decision now.”