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The haptic and tactile feedback of a Kindle does not provide the same support for mental reconstruction of a story as a print pocket book does.

Researchers at Norway’s Stavanger University say that you’re less likely to remember stuff reading it from a Kindle than you are a book, and the fact that you don’t have to turn the page may be part of the reason.

(Source: shortformblog)


Today, Amazon announced a new feature for its Kindle e-reader called  Library Lending, which will enable users to borrow e-books from more  than 11,000 libraries in the US. The feature will launch later this  year, and be available for all Kindle generations.
For Kindle users, this will open a trove of free e-books to borrow  on-the-go. For publishing as a whole, it marks yet another sign that in  an industry of paper and hardcovers—even those stored in the basements  of old, dusty institutions like libraries—the transition to the digital  age is all but inevitable. How are libraries going to cope with this  transition?



(Picture via bookshelfporn, peopleasplaces, Papervision3D Panorama)

Today, Amazon announced a new feature for its Kindle e-reader called Library Lending, which will enable users to borrow e-books from more than 11,000 libraries in the US. The feature will launch later this year, and be available for all Kindle generations.

For Kindle users, this will open a trove of free e-books to borrow on-the-go. For publishing as a whole, it marks yet another sign that in an industry of paper and hardcovers—even those stored in the basements of old, dusty institutions like libraries—the transition to the digital age is all but inevitable. How are libraries going to cope with this transition?

(Picture via bookshelfporn, peopleasplaces, Papervision3D Panorama)