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With an estimated 2.3 million Americans behind bars, the U.S. incarcerates a larger percentage of its population than any other nation on Earth. As a result, one out of every 28 children grows up with a parent in jail—an average of one child per classroom.
These numbers are the reason why Sesame Street Workshop has created Alex the Muppet, the first Sesame character to have a father in prison. He’s an average kid who has some extra baggage in life and is struggling to cope.

With an estimated 2.3 million Americans behind bars, the U.S. incarcerates a larger percentage of its population than any other nation on Earth. As a result, one out of every 28 children grows up with a parent in jail—an average of one child per classroom.

These numbers are the reason why Sesame Street Workshop has created Alex the Muppet, the first Sesame character to have a father in prison. He’s an average kid who has some extra baggage in life and is struggling to cope.

Live at 1:30pm today — Digital Royalty CEO Amy Jo Martin will answer your questions about kids and digital branding:

Social media and kids: sounds scary, but there are upsides. Creating a great digital footprint can help your kids get into good colleges and secure lucrative jobs in the future. Submit your questions ahead of time here: http://trib.al/vQJvHrU
Also — be sure to read Amy Jo’s Fast Company essay today: The Truth About Kids And Social Media.
 
[Photo: Jill Richards]
 
Live at 1:30pm today — Digital Royalty CEO Amy Jo Martin will answer your questions about kids and digital branding:

Social media and kids: sounds scary, but there are upsides. Creating a great digital footprint can help your kids get into good colleges and secure lucrative jobs in the future. 

Submit your questions ahead of time here: http://trib.al/vQJvHrU

Also — be sure to read Amy Jo’s Fast Company essay today: The Truth About Kids And Social Media.

 

[Photo: Jill Richards]

 

For most people, high school science fairs yield amusing but not altogether practical results: your baking soda and vinegar volcanoes, your potato clocks. There are exceptions, of course—15 year-old Jack Andraka created a cheap, efficient pancreatic cancer sensor for the Intel International Science and Engineering Fair. And there are the finalists in Google’s annual Science Fair, which invites entrants ages 13 through 18 to compete for a variety of prizes. These kids are results are anything but amusing. They’re potentially world changing.
Below, we look at five of our favorite finalists (there are 15 in total). The winner will be crowned next month.
5 Kids Who Are Using Science To Change The World

For most people, high school science fairs yield amusing but not altogether practical results: your baking soda and vinegar volcanoes, your potato clocks. There are exceptions, of course—15 year-old Jack Andraka created a cheap, efficient pancreatic cancer sensor for the Intel International Science and Engineering Fair. And there are the finalists in Google’s annual Science Fair, which invites entrants ages 13 through 18 to compete for a variety of prizes. These kids are results are anything but amusing. They’re potentially world changing.

Below, we look at five of our favorite finalists (there are 15 in total). The winner will be crowned next month.

5 Kids Who Are Using Science To Change The World