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In 2012 the Pebble smartwatch became the most backed product in Kickstarter history, gaining $10.3 million during its fundraising period.
That record stood until yesterday, when another product smashed Pebble’s pledges—earning an astonishing $11,045,769 (and counting) for a Kickstarter project that still has around 24 hours on the clock.
The project? The Coolest Cooler: a $299 USB-enabled, Buetooth speaker-pumping, illuminated, partitioned, accessory-holding cooler featuring an onboard blender. It is, to put it simply, the most incredible story in crowdfunding history—and made all the more amazing by the fact that Portland-based creator Ryan Grepper only set out to raise $50,000.
So how did a glorified drinks holder become a Kickstarter record breaker?
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In 2012 the Pebble smartwatch became the most backed product in Kickstarter history, gaining $10.3 million during its fundraising period.

That record stood until yesterday, when another product smashed Pebble’s pledges—earning an astonishing $11,045,769 (and counting) for a Kickstarter project that still has around 24 hours on the clock.

The project? The Coolest Cooler: a $299 USB-enabled, Buetooth speaker-pumping, illuminated, partitioned, accessory-holding cooler featuring an onboard blender. It is, to put it simply, the most incredible story in crowdfunding history—and made all the more amazing by the fact that Portland-based creator Ryan Grepper only set out to raise $50,000.

So how did a glorified drinks holder become a Kickstarter record breaker?

Read More>

While Reddit’s amateur sleuths tend to draw groans or worse for their sloppy crowdsourcing efforts (misidentifying the Boston Marathon suspects comes to mind), an English blogger has carved out a vital place in the news cycle with his meticulous and tenacious crowdsourced reporting.
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While Reddit’s amateur sleuths tend to draw groans or worse for their sloppy crowdsourcing efforts (misidentifying the Boston Marathon suspects comes to mind), an English blogger has carved out a vital place in the news cycle with his meticulous and tenacious crowdsourced reporting.

Read More>

Meet the world’s fastest hot tub and Furby’s slightly less evil cousin, among others.
Kickstarter and Indiegogo are home to some awesome new products, and many more strange ones. After taking a deep dive into this month’s crowdfunding campaigns, we were left incredulous at the sight of some of these projects—for reasons good and bad. Some of these are incredibly well executed by really smart people; others are scams that would make Bernie Madoff blush. The main qualifier: a certain amount of head-scratching perplexity.
Read More>

Meet the world’s fastest hot tub and Furby’s slightly less evil cousin, among others.

Kickstarter and Indiegogo are home to some awesome new products, and many more strange ones. After taking a deep dive into this month’s crowdfunding campaigns, we were left incredulous at the sight of some of these projects—for reasons good and bad. Some of these are incredibly well executed by really smart people; others are scams that would make Bernie Madoff blush. The main qualifier: a certain amount of head-scratching perplexity.

Read More>

kickstarter:

“I think Aaron’s story is compelling for lots of different reasons. My previous film We Are Legion followed hackers and activists, so I was following Aaron’s story right from when he was arrested. He was so deeply engaged in so many issues that are really relevant about information, our relationship with information, the way the Internet is changing, and the freedoms of the Internet. And then I was struck by how much his story resonated with people far beyond the communities in which he was a celebrity—people that didn’t even know him.” 
—Brian Knappenberger, director of The Internet’s Own Boy, on Aaron Swartz. Read the rest of the Q&A and watch the new trailer, over here.

kickstarter:

I think Aaron’s story is compelling for lots of different reasons. My previous film We Are Legion followed hackers and activists, so I was following Aaron’s story right from when he was arrested. He was so deeply engaged in so many issues that are really relevant about information, our relationship with information, the way the Internet is changing, and the freedoms of the Internet. And then I was struck by how much his story resonated with people far beyond the communities in which he was a celebrity—people that didn’t even know him.”

—Brian Knappenberger, director of The Internet’s Own Boy, on Aaron Swartz. Read the rest of the Q&A and watch the new trailer, over here.

Her new album, “Theatre Is Evil,” is the most successful music-based Kickstarter project to date. But is Amanda Palmer’s tweet-happy, DIY, often NSFW approach a model for independent artists?

We’re down to the final minutes of the singer-songwriter-provocateur’s month-long Kickstarter campaign, a crowdfunding effort that shocked the entertainment world by becoming the site’s most successful music-based project to date. The pledges—which had an official target of $100,000, and which had privately been budgeted to hit $500,000—have already topped a million dollars.

To celebrate the countdown, Palmer, who the Huffington Post called “the social media queen of rock & roll,” is throwing a six-hour, block party-style celebration in a parking lot behind some warehouses along Brooklyn’s Gowanus Canal. To a surprisingly “classic pop” soundtrack (the Jackson 5, the Who, Ray Charles), she and her crew dressed up in old-time bathing suits and frolicked in an aquarium-style clear box on the back of a truck, scribbling the names of everyone who contributed on pages ripped out of phone books and holding each one up to the laptop that’s webcasting the event. In the end, it will be almost 25,000 names, each of whom pledged between $1 and $10,000 for a menu of products and experiences ranging from a download of her new album, Theatre is Evil, (out Tuesday, Sept. 11) to art books and customized turntables, up to private concerts and dinners with the artist.

Read more: Amanda Palmer’s Crowd-Powered, Naked Creativity Machine


When faced with the reality of these products, disappointment is inevitable—not just because they’re too little too late (if at all) but for even weirder reasons. We don’t really want the stuff. We’re paying for the sensation of a hypothetical idea, not the experience of a realized product. For the pleasure of desiring it. For the experience of watching it succeed beyond expectations or to fail dramatically. Kickstarter is just another form of entertainment. It’s QVC for the Net set. And just like QVC, the products are usually less appealing than the excitement of learning about them for the first time and getting in early on the sale.

Kickstarter: Crowdfunding Platform Or Reality Show?

When faced with the reality of these products, disappointment is inevitable—not just because they’re too little too late (if at all) but for even weirder reasons. We don’t really want the stuff. We’re paying for the sensation of a hypothetical idea, not the experience of a realized product. For the pleasure of desiring it. For the experience of watching it succeed beyond expectations or to fail dramatically. Kickstarter is just another form of entertainment. It’s QVC for the Net set. And just like QVC, the products are usually less appealing than the excitement of learning about them for the first time and getting in early on the sale.

Kickstarter: Crowdfunding Platform Or Reality Show?

On the surface, Rock the Post follows the same reward-based formula as Kickstarter: entrepreneurs post ideas, fans offer support, and if the pitch is successful, prizes are handed out (and the platform takes a cut). But Rock the Post’s emphasis is on helping small businesses facilitate connections not only to funding, but also  programmers, designers, and anyone else who can help get their idea off the ground. “At the early stage of a business, the most important thing is not the product,” says Cremades. “It’s the people behind it, and how they’re going to face challenges.”
Beyond Kickstarter: Rock The Post’s Alejandro Cremades On The Future Of Crowdfunding

On the surface, Rock the Post follows the same reward-based formula as Kickstarter: entrepreneurs post ideas, fans offer support, and if the pitch is successful, prizes are handed out (and the platform takes a cut). But Rock the Post’s emphasis is on helping small businesses facilitate connections not only to funding, but also  programmers, designers, and anyone else who can help get their idea off the ground. “At the early stage of a business, the most important thing is not the product,” says Cremades. “It’s the people behind it, and how they’re going to face challenges.”

Beyond Kickstarter: Rock The Post’s Alejandro Cremades On The Future Of Crowdfunding


"We want playing our games to entertain people on many different levels. Deeper down, I want to make a connection with the player, and it’s the way, to me, of saying to the person playing the game that they’re not alone in the world."

This behind-the-scenes interview with the brutal legend of video game design proves that listening to your customers can pay off in unexpected ways.
Tim Schafer’s $3.3 Million Kickstarter Adventure Could Level-Up The Entire Video Game Industry

"We want playing our games to entertain people on many different levels. Deeper down, I want to make a connection with the player, and it’s the way, to me, of saying to the person playing the game that they’re not alone in the world."

This behind-the-scenes interview with the brutal legend of video game design proves that listening to your customers can pay off in unexpected ways.

Tim Schafer’s $3.3 Million Kickstarter Adventure Could Level-Up The Entire Video Game Industry