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Yes, the iPhone fingerprint sensor can be “hacked.” No, you shouldn’t worry about it. 

Even if the attack proves to be real, this isn’t a casual, fast trick. The attacker would have to be lucky enough to get a perfect print of the correct finger to unlock the iPhone, which means they’d have to find that specific print, or be forced to try several fake prints. Anyone this intent on hacking your iPhone would need prolonged access to it.”

More info

Will Apple’s fingerprint sensor come to Macbooks?
Apple had to do a lot of work just to make the sensor accessible in mobile devices. “You’re basically exposing a piece of silicon that’s going to be in your pocket with hard keys and coins. We were able to evolve the technology to address aesthetics and durability.”

Will Apple’s fingerprint sensor come to Macbooks?

Apple had to do a lot of work just to make the sensor accessible in mobile devices. “You’re basically exposing a piece of silicon that’s going to be in your pocket with hard keys and coins. We were able to evolve the technology to address aesthetics and durability.”

As far back as the early 2000s, fingerprint sensors were embedded in a slew of devices, from laptops produced by HP and Toshiba to phones made by Nokia and Motorola. But while Apple was able to make fingerprint sensors feel like a fresh idea, its competitors were only capable of making the technology feel superfluous, stale, and unready for market.

How the PC industry failed to best Apple… again

An iPhone 5S? New Macs? An iWatch? 

Apple has scheduled a big press event tomorrow, at which it promises it will “brighten everyone’s day.” This, we presume, is a veiled reference to the colorful plastic iPhone ”lite,” possibly called the iPhone 5C, that has been revealed in a number of leaks through the summer. But what else may Apple have planned for us tomorrow? (We’ll be live-blogging the entire event here).