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This insanely slippery non-stick coating gets every last bit out of jars. Even glue jars. Watch

LiquiGlide is a super slippery coating that can be applied to all types of surfaces. WhenCo.Exist first broke the news about the invention, Dave Smith, the PhD candidate behind the novel substance, was focused on using LiquiGlide to make ketchup flow from jars like water—so we no longer had to tussle with that bottle of Heinz like a Shake Weight. (His aim was noble: Smith estimated the solution could save more than a million tons of annual food waste in the sauce industry alone.)

Since then, Smith has dropped out of MIT, incorporated LiquiGlide, and built up a team of nearly 20 mechanical engineers and nano-technologists. His company is now negotiating deals with the largest consumer packaged goods companies to bring LiquiGlide to everything from toothpaste and syrup to beer. He’s also exploring how the technology could be applied to a new range of industries, including medical, manufacturing, and even transportation products.

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Makey Makey is a little circuit board that comes with a set of alligator clips. You can attach them to anything even mildly conductive (a body part, a glass of water, alphabet noodles, paper clips, Play Dough, or fruit for example) and use that thing to control your computer as though you were hitting the keyboard or moving the mouse.

Turn a bunch of bananas into a piano. Turn your friends into a synthesizer. Turn a trampoline into a slideshow controller. Turn your hand into a game glove. The possibilities are endless. 

Other findings of this study:

 
Most young people (61% of women, 54% of men) view Japan, not the U.S., as the leader in invention.
Young women and men alike advocate more government funding and school invention projects to spark interest in innovation.
More women appeared to be interested in the design and brainstorming phase of invention, while men took a greater interest in actually building or implementing an invention.
About a third of the young men and women viewed inventors as “people who most often work at home or in their garage.”

Other findings of this study:

  • Most young people (61% of women, 54% of men) view Japan, not the U.S., as the leader in invention.
  • Young women and men alike advocate more government funding and school invention projects to spark interest in innovation.
  • More women appeared to be interested in the design and brainstorming phase of invention, while men took a greater interest in actually building or implementing an invention.
  • About a third of the young men and women viewed inventors as “people who most often work at home or in their garage.”