FastCompany Magazine

The official Tumblr of Fast Company.

What Would We Do If The Internet Crashed?
There’s no Plan B for what to do if the entire Net goes down. We should totally get on that.
In a recent TED talk, Danny Hillis, who just so happens to be the third person ever to register a domain name on the Internet and was around during its formative early days, pointed out something that may surprise you: If the Internet was taken out by a virus, an accident, or a deliberate, concentrated attack, we have no “plan B.” And because so many surprising services and systems rely on the Net today, much of what makes our society work could simply cease functioning…
Here’s the full story.
What would you do? 
[Image: Flickr user noii]

What Would We Do If The Internet Crashed?

There’s no Plan B for what to do if the entire Net goes down. We should totally get on that.

In a recent TED talk, Danny Hillis, who just so happens to be the third person ever to register a domain name on the Internet and was around during its formative early days, pointed out something that may surprise you: If the Internet was taken out by a virus, an accident, or a deliberate, concentrated attack, we have no “plan B.” And because so many surprising services and systems rely on the Net today, much of what makes our society work could simply cease functioning…

Here’s the full story.

What would you do? 

[Image: Flickr user noii]

fastcodesign:

ust 20 ISPs are responsible for half of the world’s entire haul of Internet scam andspam emails, says a study. The thesis (you can read it here in a .pdf file), entitled “Internet Bad Neighborhoods” is the work of a pair of researchers, Moreira Moura and Giovane Cesare, from the University of Twente, who researched over 42,000 Internet Service Providers worldwide and found the following trends:

  • Most spam comes from the U.S.
  • Most phishing comes from Asia—of that, Indian network BSNL came top of the list.
  • The most crime-ridden network is Nigeria’s Spectranet.
  • The majority of bad ISPs are to be found in India, Brazil, and Vietnam.

(Source: fastcodesign)

[Image: Courtesy Akamai]
From satellite modems to temporary packet radio or Wi-Fi networks to secret “communication kits,” here's how Syrians might communicate with the outside word amid an Internet shutdown.

[Image: Courtesy Akamai]

From satellite modems to temporary packet radio or Wi-Fi networks to secret “communication kits,” here's how Syrians might communicate with the outside word amid an Internet shutdown.


Trolling comes in a variety of flavors, and, as Phillips discovered, some trolling was surprisingly altruistic. One troll friend told her how he’d taken offense to Facebook’s anti-troll stance and infiltrated a Ku Klux Klan group that was on Facebook. Phillips’ troll friend set out to troll the Klan, but according to his account, “All they did was play Farmville and send each other hugs,” Phillips says.
Other trolls set out to bother commenters who make sexist or racist remarks in public sites. But it’s not a straightforward attack by any means. “It’s a weird troll-by-parrot thing,” Phillips explains, “You trick misogynists into saying really ridiculous obnoxious things about women and you pretend to be agreeing with them, and you turn suddenly. And the person you’re trolling has no idea what just happened, but he knows he’s really mad about it.”

Whitney Phillips got her PhD from the University of Oregon in English with a Folklore structured emphasis. But the subject of her dissertation was Internet trolls. Here’s some of what she learned about the species. Read more->

Trolling comes in a variety of flavors, and, as Phillips discovered, some trolling was surprisingly altruistic. One troll friend told her how he’d taken offense to Facebook’s anti-troll stance and infiltrated a Ku Klux Klan group that was on Facebook. Phillips’ troll friend set out to troll the Klan, but according to his account, “All they did was play Farmville and send each other hugs,” Phillips says.

Other trolls set out to bother commenters who make sexist or racist remarks in public sites. But it’s not a straightforward attack by any means. “It’s a weird troll-by-parrot thing,” Phillips explains, “You trick misogynists into saying really ridiculous obnoxious things about women and you pretend to be agreeing with them, and you turn suddenly. And the person you’re trolling has no idea what just happened, but he knows he’s really mad about it.”

Whitney Phillips got her PhD from the University of Oregon in English with a Folklore structured emphasis. But the subject of her dissertation was Internet trolls. Here’s some of what she learned about the species. Read more->

The folks at the London-based “ideas agency” Syzygy just sent us this illustration by their creative director, Peter Jaworowski, of the “20 greatest, funniest and most insane internet events from 2011.” Here’s the thing: You have to guess what they are by decoding the visual clues.
 Read more->

The folks at the London-based “ideas agency” Syzygy just sent us this illustration by their creative director, Peter Jaworowski, of the “20 greatest, funniest and most insane internet events from 2011.” Here’s the thing: You have to guess what they are by decoding the visual clues.

Read more->

Is technological connectivity mankind’s next evolutionary step?

"We created computers as an extension of our brains, and now we’re connecting through those computers and the Internet cloud as a way of expanding them," - Tiffany Shlain, Filmmaker & Webby Awards founder

In her new documentary, Connected, which premiered at Sundance this year, Shlain sees digital connection as the next step in harnessing our collective brainpower—as long as we don’t lose our ability to relate to each other.

Read more…


The Egyptian government shut down Al Jazeera’s Cairo offices, withdrew the accreditation of their reporters and forced the network off an Egyptian-owned satellite that supplies television to much of the Middle East.
The Committee to Protect Journalists also reports that Egyptian authorities are blocking reception of Al Jazeera’s Arabic station from other satellite networks. Al Jazeera appears to be jammed for subscribers to the Hotbird satellite and other services within Egypt. Al Jazeera English, however, remains available via satellite within Egypt.
— Egypt Blocking Al Jazeera Broadcasts to Much of Middle East

The Egyptian government shut down Al Jazeera’s Cairo offices, withdrew the accreditation of their reporters and forced the network off an Egyptian-owned satellite that supplies television to much of the Middle East.

The Committee to Protect Journalists also reports that Egyptian authorities are blocking reception of Al Jazeera’s Arabic station from other satellite networks. Al Jazeera appears to be jammed for subscribers to the Hotbird satellite and other services within Egypt. Al Jazeera English, however, remains available via satellite within Egypt.

Egypt Blocking Al Jazeera Broadcasts to Much of Middle East