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Daily Fast Feed Roundup

Happy Hump Day! Here’s a quick rundown of what you need to know today: 

  • TripAdvisor just bought GateGuru, an app that offers travelers airport info in real-time. 

Have a great day! —M. Cecelia Bittner and Jessica Hullinger

I love my devices and services, and I love being connected to the global hive mind. I am neither a Luddite nor a hermit, but I am more aware of the price we pay: lack of depth, reduced accuracy, lower quality, impatience, selfishness, and mental exhaustion, to name but a few. In choosing to digitally enhance, hyperconnect, and constantly share our lives, we risk not living them…

Baratunde Thurston 

From his piece #Unplug: Baratunde Thurston left the internet for 25 days, and you should too.

Here’s more about #unplugging

Perhaps because I wasn’t always getting updates on events happening in faraway places, I focused on the world around me, especially nearby Vanderbilt Avenue, which turns out to be quite a place, especially for food. Late one night, I entered a restaurant called Cornelius, lured by large-print signs in the window advertising meat. Whiskey. Oysters. I could not resist.

Baratunde Thurston on the happenings of the first week of his digital detox
Meet our tech editor, Chris Dannen. Chris edits Fast Company’s software and media experimentation site, Co.Labs. Here are the three best things he found on the Internet this week:
1. The “McDonald’s theory of bad ideas” This isn’t entirely new, but I love how Jason Jones recasts it to apply to group collaboration. We probably know what we’d all want in an ideal world. But the hardest part is establishing a floor—what suggestion sucks so much that we’d never do it? Let’s start there and work our way up. The by-product is that we all reveal what we consider to be “self-evidently bad,” a process which, in and of itself, can help everyone question their assumptions.
2. Julian Assange’s take on the new book by Google Executive Chairman Eric Schmidt The book is, he says, “an attempt by Google to position itself as America’s geopolitical visionary,” a notion I find alternately horrifying and inspiring. The piece strikes at the core of my ambivalence about Google, which is a subject of something I’m writing this week, two weeks after my trip to their big developer conference. I’ve never come across a company with such vision in some areas—try out a Chromebook Pixel—and such a sad lack of humanity in others—ahem, Google Glass. Never has such a bipolar company had so much power, so much money, and such an uncertain future as they wean off display advertising.
3. ElectroFurI spotted the founder of this company at Google I/O wearing a full-length, multicolored glowing faux-fur coat that absolutely blew my mind. We’ve been covering the right (and wrong) way to design wearable technology, and I’m convinced this sort of thing—while obviously a little ostentatious for everyday use—is hinting at the most inspiring future for fashion design and software you wear.
If you want to learn more about Chris, check out his recent interview in Nieman Lab. He’ll also be presenting at the June 27 Hacks/Hackers meetup. Come and say hello!
 More recommendations from our team!

Meet our tech editor, Chris DannenChris edits Fast Company’s software and media experimentation site, Co.Labs. Here are the three best things he found on the Internet this week:

1. The “McDonald’s theory of bad ideas” 
This isn’t entirely new, but I love how Jason Jones recasts it to apply to group collaboration. We probably know what we’d all want in an ideal world. But the hardest part is establishing a floor—what suggestion sucks so much that we’d never do it? Let’s start there and work our way up. The by-product is that we all reveal what we consider to be “self-evidently bad,” a process which, in and of itself, can help everyone question their assumptions.

2. Julian Assange’s take on the new book by Google Executive Chairman Eric Schmidt 
The book is, he says, “an attempt by Google to position itself as America’s geopolitical visionary,” a notion I find alternately horrifying and inspiring. The piece strikes at the core of my ambivalence about Google, which is a subject of something I’m writing this week, two weeks after my trip to their big developer conference. I’ve never come across a company with such vision in some areas—try out a Chromebook Pixel—and such a sad lack of humanity in others—ahem, Google Glass. Never has such a bipolar company had so much power, so much money, and such an uncertain future as they wean off display advertising.

3. ElectroFur
I spotted the founder of this company at Google I/O wearing a full-length, multicolored glowing faux-fur coat that absolutely blew my mind. We’ve been covering the right (and wrong) way to design wearable technology, and I’m convinced this sort of thing—while obviously a little ostentatious for everyday use—is hinting at the most inspiring future for fashion design and software you wear.

If you want to learn more about Chris, check out his recent interview in Nieman Lab. He’ll also be presenting at the June 27 Hacks/Hackers meetup. Come and say hello!

 More recommendations from our team!

The highlight of Google’s year is the I/O developers conference it hosts each May. On Wednesday, 6,000 people converged on San Francisco’s Moscone Center and more than one million tuned in to the YouTube livestream of the conference keynote to hear about the newest Google products and services. And during the three-and-a-half-hour opening keynote, Google delivered. And delivered.

The sheer number of new product features was staggering—engineering director Vic Gundotra unveiled 41 new features for Google Plus alone—but only a few made the cut for being truly innovative.

Here are the most important features and products that you’ll want to know about.

What Would We Do If The Internet Crashed?
There’s no Plan B for what to do if the entire Net goes down. We should totally get on that.
In a recent TED talk, Danny Hillis, who just so happens to be the third person ever to register a domain name on the Internet and was around during its formative early days, pointed out something that may surprise you: If the Internet was taken out by a virus, an accident, or a deliberate, concentrated attack, we have no “plan B.” And because so many surprising services and systems rely on the Net today, much of what makes our society work could simply cease functioning…
Here’s the full story.
What would you do? 
[Image: Flickr user noii]

What Would We Do If The Internet Crashed?

There’s no Plan B for what to do if the entire Net goes down. We should totally get on that.

In a recent TED talk, Danny Hillis, who just so happens to be the third person ever to register a domain name on the Internet and was around during its formative early days, pointed out something that may surprise you: If the Internet was taken out by a virus, an accident, or a deliberate, concentrated attack, we have no “plan B.” And because so many surprising services and systems rely on the Net today, much of what makes our society work could simply cease functioning…

Here’s the full story.

What would you do? 

[Image: Flickr user noii]

fastcodesign:

ust 20 ISPs are responsible for half of the world’s entire haul of Internet scam andspam emails, says a study. The thesis (you can read it here in a .pdf file), entitled “Internet Bad Neighborhoods” is the work of a pair of researchers, Moreira Moura and Giovane Cesare, from the University of Twente, who researched over 42,000 Internet Service Providers worldwide and found the following trends:

  • Most spam comes from the U.S.
  • Most phishing comes from Asia—of that, Indian network BSNL came top of the list.
  • The most crime-ridden network is Nigeria’s Spectranet.
  • The majority of bad ISPs are to be found in India, Brazil, and Vietnam.

(Source: fastcodesign)

[Image: Courtesy Akamai]
From satellite modems to temporary packet radio or Wi-Fi networks to secret “communication kits,” here's how Syrians might communicate with the outside word amid an Internet shutdown.

[Image: Courtesy Akamai]

From satellite modems to temporary packet radio or Wi-Fi networks to secret “communication kits,” here's how Syrians might communicate with the outside word amid an Internet shutdown.