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Internet recommendations from Sarah Kessler, Fast Company's Associate Editor:
1. The “Can Men Wear Shorts?” debateThe Pacific Standard was the only publication I saw bring an academic into this debate, which is exactly what it needed.
2. Kristin Wiig as Michael Jordan with Jimmy Fallon. Perfect
3. The Pixar Theory John Lasseter, Disney’s chief creative officer, recently told mewhile I was reporting an upcoming story that mixing characters from different Pixar movies has always been taboo. And after reading Jon Negroni’s “Pixar Theory,” I finally understand why: Putting Pixar characters together would make it far too obvious that all the studio’s movies are actually part of the same story—beginning with the witch in Brave experimenting with giving animals the ability to speak. I can’t believe we didn’t see this before.
Here, a few more staff recommendations for you! 

[Image: Flickr user JD Hancock]

Internet recommendations from Sarah Kessler, Fast Company's Associate Editor:

1. The “Can Men Wear Shorts?” debate
The Pacific Standard was the only publication I saw bring an academic into this debate, which is exactly what it needed.

2. Kristin Wiig as Michael Jordan with Jimmy Fallon. Perfect

3. The Pixar Theory 
John Lasseter, Disney’s chief creative officer, recently told me
while I was reporting an upcoming story that mixing characters from different Pixar movies has always been taboo. And after reading Jon Negroni’s “Pixar Theory,” I finally understand why: Putting Pixar characters together would make it far too obvious that all the studio’s movies are actually part of the same story—beginning with the witch in Brave experimenting with giving animals the ability to speak. I can’t believe we didn’t see this before.

Here, a few more staff recommendations for you! 

[Image: Flickr user JD Hancock]

"The afternoon lazed along, and when I checked my phone at 5 p.m., I was shocked to find its battery life at a historical high-for-that-time-of-day 50%. My detox was saving battery life (!) which was saving energy (!) which was saving the earth!"
Thurston took a 25 day break from the Internet. You should, too. Here’s a printable guide to unplugging, which you can refer to when you feel the urge to reach for your phone. 

"The afternoon lazed along, and when I checked my phone at 5 p.m., I was shocked to find its battery life at a historical high-for-that-time-of-day 50%. My detox was saving battery life (!) which was saving energy (!) which was saving the earth!"

Thurston took a 25 day break from the Internet. You should, too. Here’s a printable guide to unplugging, which you can refer to when you feel the urge to reach for your phone. 

Upworthy.com, dedicated to sharing “stuff that matters,” drives 20% of interactions around media online. You read that right. 
Here are 3 rules for going viral from the most viral site on the web:
1. Spend half your time on the headline.2. But make it sound like you’re talking to your bff.3. Know what strong feeling you want to evoke. There’d better be one.  
[Rainbow: MountainHardcore via Shutterstock]

Upworthy.com, dedicated to sharing “stuff that matters,” drives 20% of interactions around media online. You read that right. 

Here are 3 rules for going viral from the most viral site on the web:

1. Spend half your time on the headline.
2. But make it sound like you’re talking to your bff.
3. Know what strong feeling you want to evoke. There’d better be one.  

[Rainbow: MountainHardcore via Shutterstock]

I am here” day is a time to “set aside our technology and to-do lists, choose a quarter of the city we wanted to know better, and explore it for a full day… . [It is] a kind of antimodern communal experiment: giving our gadgets a secular Sabbath; reveling in friendship and conversation of a kind that Facebook doesn’t do; being thickly in one place, not thinly everywhere.

Baratunde Thurston on the perks of taking a digital hiatus.

At the bar, my recently rediscovered heads-up
display—aka my eyes—revealed a person next to me, and for several hours I found myself in a fascinating conversation with one of the dancers from the Broadway musical Spider-Man.

Baratunde Thurston, arguably one of the most connected celebrities there are, took 25 days away from the Internet. Here’s what he learned. 
As part of our #Unplug series we asked, “What do you miss (if anything) about life before the digital age?” Here are some of our favorite responses:
"The art of conversation, mystique and actually getting to know a person at a natural rate than via online presence… and of course privacy…” —Bree Williams 
"Peacefulness and serenity." —Henry Johns
"The happy ignorance of not knowing how genuinely crazy some of my friends and family are.” —Todd Wilson
"People actually having to work to stalk you." —Daisuke Iwamura
"Wonder. Before the Internet you would wonder about everything. Now you can just look it up." —Matthew Green 
Here, a few more things we miss about life before the digital age

As part of our #Unplug series we asked, “What do you miss (if anything) about life before the digital age?” Here are some of our favorite responses:

  • "The art of conversation, mystique and actually getting to know a person at a natural rate than via online presence… and of course privacy…” —Bree Williams 
  • "Peacefulness and serenity."Henry Johns
  • "The happy ignorance of not knowing how genuinely crazy some of my friends and family are.” —Todd Wilson
  • "People actually having to work to stalk you." —Daisuke Iwamura
  • "Wonder. Before the Internet you would wonder about everything. Now you can just look it up." —Matthew Green 

Here, a few more things we miss about life before the digital age

Here are four things that Baratunde Thurston realized during his 25-day hiatus from the internet:

1. I had become obsessed with The Information. 
2. I shared too much. 
3. I was addicted to myself. 
4. I forsook the benefits of the Industrial Age.

"The greatest gift I gave myself was a restored appreciation for disengagement, silence, and emptiness. I don’t need to fill every time slot with an appointment, and I don’t need to fill every mental opening with stimulus."

Here are four things that Baratunde Thurston realized during his 25-day hiatus from the internet:

1. I had become obsessed with The Information.

2. I shared too much.

3. I was addicted to myself.

4. I forsook the benefits of the Industrial Age.

"The greatest gift I gave myself was a restored appreciation for disengagement, silence, and emptiness. I don’t need to fill every time slot with an appointment, and I don’t need to fill every mental opening with stimulus."

Daily Fast Feed Roundup

Happy Hump Day! Here’s a quick rundown of what you need to know today: 

  • TripAdvisor just bought GateGuru, an app that offers travelers airport info in real-time. 

Have a great day! —M. Cecelia Bittner and Jessica Hullinger

I love my devices and services, and I love being connected to the global hive mind. I am neither a Luddite nor a hermit, but I am more aware of the price we pay: lack of depth, reduced accuracy, lower quality, impatience, selfishness, and mental exhaustion, to name but a few. In choosing to digitally enhance, hyperconnect, and constantly share our lives, we risk not living them…

Baratunde Thurston 

From his piece #Unplug: Baratunde Thurston left the internet for 25 days, and you should too.

Here’s more about #unplugging

Perhaps because I wasn’t always getting updates on events happening in faraway places, I focused on the world around me, especially nearby Vanderbilt Avenue, which turns out to be quite a place, especially for food. Late one night, I entered a restaurant called Cornelius, lured by large-print signs in the window advertising meat. Whiskey. Oysters. I could not resist.

Baratunde Thurston on the happenings of the first week of his digital detox
Meet our tech editor, Chris Dannen. Chris edits Fast Company’s software and media experimentation site, Co.Labs. Here are the three best things he found on the Internet this week:
1. The “McDonald’s theory of bad ideas” This isn’t entirely new, but I love how Jason Jones recasts it to apply to group collaboration. We probably know what we’d all want in an ideal world. But the hardest part is establishing a floor—what suggestion sucks so much that we’d never do it? Let’s start there and work our way up. The by-product is that we all reveal what we consider to be “self-evidently bad,” a process which, in and of itself, can help everyone question their assumptions.
2. Julian Assange’s take on the new book by Google Executive Chairman Eric Schmidt The book is, he says, “an attempt by Google to position itself as America’s geopolitical visionary,” a notion I find alternately horrifying and inspiring. The piece strikes at the core of my ambivalence about Google, which is a subject of something I’m writing this week, two weeks after my trip to their big developer conference. I’ve never come across a company with such vision in some areas—try out a Chromebook Pixel—and such a sad lack of humanity in others—ahem, Google Glass. Never has such a bipolar company had so much power, so much money, and such an uncertain future as they wean off display advertising.
3. ElectroFurI spotted the founder of this company at Google I/O wearing a full-length, multicolored glowing faux-fur coat that absolutely blew my mind. We’ve been covering the right (and wrong) way to design wearable technology, and I’m convinced this sort of thing—while obviously a little ostentatious for everyday use—is hinting at the most inspiring future for fashion design and software you wear.
If you want to learn more about Chris, check out his recent interview in Nieman Lab. He’ll also be presenting at the June 27 Hacks/Hackers meetup. Come and say hello!
 More recommendations from our team!

Meet our tech editor, Chris DannenChris edits Fast Company’s software and media experimentation site, Co.Labs. Here are the three best things he found on the Internet this week:

1. The “McDonald’s theory of bad ideas” 
This isn’t entirely new, but I love how Jason Jones recasts it to apply to group collaboration. We probably know what we’d all want in an ideal world. But the hardest part is establishing a floor—what suggestion sucks so much that we’d never do it? Let’s start there and work our way up. The by-product is that we all reveal what we consider to be “self-evidently bad,” a process which, in and of itself, can help everyone question their assumptions.

2. Julian Assange’s take on the new book by Google Executive Chairman Eric Schmidt 
The book is, he says, “an attempt by Google to position itself as America’s geopolitical visionary,” a notion I find alternately horrifying and inspiring. The piece strikes at the core of my ambivalence about Google, which is a subject of something I’m writing this week, two weeks after my trip to their big developer conference. I’ve never come across a company with such vision in some areas—try out a Chromebook Pixel—and such a sad lack of humanity in others—ahem, Google Glass. Never has such a bipolar company had so much power, so much money, and such an uncertain future as they wean off display advertising.

3. ElectroFur
I spotted the founder of this company at Google I/O wearing a full-length, multicolored glowing faux-fur coat that absolutely blew my mind. We’ve been covering the right (and wrong) way to design wearable technology, and I’m convinced this sort of thing—while obviously a little ostentatious for everyday use—is hinting at the most inspiring future for fashion design and software you wear.

If you want to learn more about Chris, check out his recent interview in Nieman Lab. He’ll also be presenting at the June 27 Hacks/Hackers meetup. Come and say hello!

 More recommendations from our team!