FastCompany Magazine

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  • "…it snaps a photo of the fridge’s contents whenever you open the door, allowing you to check what food you already have before you stop off at the store on your way home from work.”

  • Your SmartThings hub could detect that you’ve woken up, either through a motion sensor outside your bedroom or a biometric wristband like the Jawbone Up, and turn on the lights in your kitchen and activate the outlet to which your coffee pot is connected, starting the coffee brewing if you had the foresight to put the grinds in the night before. When you enter the kitchen, motion sensors could trigger a Sonos speaker to give you a weather report and play the news. When you leave for work, the home senses that you are gone and shuts everything down.”

2014: The year companies try to make the kitchen the smartest room in the house

More than ever, this Internet of things reflects the way technology is working to make our lives easier, safer, and more enjoyable. But is it really? In some ways, yes: Electronic devices tell us how to reverse our cars, Siri is there to help with questions big and small, and Google intuits what we are really looking for when we’re not quite sure of the spelling.
What’s not to love? I certainly did love it all, until it started going wrong, and it had nothing to do with that Israeli security firm. When I finally got my car started that day, see, I promptly reversed into the wall of the car park. My brain was in automatic mode and my own car was too old to have warning beeps. The very next day I lost the bag that had my phone in it at the airport. When I wanted to call a good friend for some moral support, I had forgotten his phone number. I was frazzled—in part because up until then I was rather unaware of how dependent I’d become on this network of stuff.
How I Busted Out Of My Addictive Technology Loop

More than ever, this Internet of things reflects the way technology is working to make our lives easier, safer, and more enjoyable. But is it really? In some ways, yes: Electronic devices tell us how to reverse our cars, Siri is there to help with questions big and small, and Google intuits what we are really looking for when we’re not quite sure of the spelling.

What’s not to love? I certainly did love it all, until it started going wrong, and it had nothing to do with that Israeli security firm. When I finally got my car started that day, see, I promptly reversed into the wall of the car park. My brain was in automatic mode and my own car was too old to have warning beeps. The very next day I lost the bag that had my phone in it at the airport. When I wanted to call a good friend for some moral support, I had forgotten his phone number. I was frazzled—in part because up until then I was rather unaware of how dependent I’d become on this network of stuff.

How I Busted Out Of My Addictive Technology Loop