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Square, the payments startup from Twitter cofounder Jack Dorsey, has prototyped a Square credit card. The plastic card is all black, and save for the card holder’s name emblazoned on the face, features no logos—not even Square’s. Over the past year, multiple sources indicate Square employees have been carrying the card—seen here below, partially blurred to protect the card holder’s identity—around in their wallets.

However, despite buzz about the potential of a Square credit card, other company sources indicate the project was recently killed.
Details of the rumored prototype came to light during reporting for Fast Company's profile of Square, published this week. As Square seeks to unearth new sources of revenue beyond its core business of payments processing, the company has launched a slew of new products, including Square Market, Cash, Feedback, Invoices, Capital, Dashboard, and on Monday, August 11, Appointments. Some insiders expected the Square credit card would be a promising addition to the mix, potentially opening the company up to a swath of lucrative consumer loyalty and rewards services. But after pressing the company multiple times about the project, Square finally confirmed that it’s not launching a credit card. Or, should we say, the company is no longer launching one. And the reason why highlights the difficulties Square faces in the immensely complex financial space.
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Square, the payments startup from Twitter cofounder Jack Dorsey, has prototyped a Square credit card. The plastic card is all black, and save for the card holder’s name emblazoned on the face, features no logos—not even Square’s. Over the past year, multiple sources indicate Square employees have been carrying the card—seen here below, partially blurred to protect the card holder’s identity—around in their wallets.

image

However, despite buzz about the potential of a Square credit card, other company sources indicate the project was recently killed.

Details of the rumored prototype came to light during reporting for Fast Company's profile of Square, published this week. As Square seeks to unearth new sources of revenue beyond its core business of payments processing, the company has launched a slew of new products, including Square Market, Cash, Feedback, Invoices, Capital, Dashboard, and on Monday, August 11, Appointments. Some insiders expected the Square credit card would be a promising addition to the mix, potentially opening the company up to a swath of lucrative consumer loyalty and rewards services. But after pressing the company multiple times about the project, Square finally confirmed that it’s not launching a credit card. Or, should we say, the company is no longer launching one. And the reason why highlights the difficulties Square faces in the immensely complex financial space.

Read More>

Tell it your prescription, and the experimental screen makes blurry images clear for you.
People with vision problems, rejoice: A team from Microsoft, U.C. Berkeley, and MIT has created an experimental screen technology that would allow you to view your devices clearly without your glasses. 
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Tell it your prescription, and the experimental screen makes blurry images clear for you.

People with vision problems, rejoice: A team from Microsoft, U.C. Berkeley, and MIT has created an experimental screen technology that would allow you to view your devices clearly without your glasses. 

Read More>

The Internet of things will soon be spitting out more data than today’s transistors can handle, but HP thinks it has a solution: The Machine.
Imagine a single device that, like the people in Honey I Shrunk/Blew Up the Kids, comes in whatever size a storyline demands. It can be the size of a server and weigh hundreds of pounds, the size of a PC, a smartphone, or a miniature sensor.
Welcome to The Machine: HP’s vision for a universal building block of the Internet of Things. The Machine is designed to operate in a world where there’s dramatically more data that’s too big to move. The device—which HP says can fulfill the role of a phone, a server, a workstation—is a big bet for HP, as the growth of the PC market continues to slow.
Read More>

The Internet of things will soon be spitting out more data than today’s transistors can handle, but HP thinks it has a solution: The Machine.

Imagine a single device that, like the people in Honey I Shrunk/Blew Up the Kids, comes in whatever size a storyline demands. It can be the size of a server and weigh hundreds of pounds, the size of a PC, a smartphone, or a miniature sensor.

Welcome to The Machine: HP’s vision for a universal building block of the Internet of Things. The Machine is designed to operate in a world where there’s dramatically more data that’s too big to move. The device—which HP says can fulfill the role of a phone, a server, a workstation—is a big bet for HP, as the growth of the PC market continues to slow.

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  • "…it snaps a photo of the fridge’s contents whenever you open the door, allowing you to check what food you already have before you stop off at the store on your way home from work.”

  • Your SmartThings hub could detect that you’ve woken up, either through a motion sensor outside your bedroom or a biometric wristband like the Jawbone Up, and turn on the lights in your kitchen and activate the outlet to which your coffee pot is connected, starting the coffee brewing if you had the foresight to put the grinds in the night before. When you enter the kitchen, motion sensors could trigger a Sonos speaker to give you a weather report and play the news. When you leave for work, the home senses that you are gone and shuts everything down.”

2014: The year companies try to make the kitchen the smartest room in the house

More than ever, this Internet of things reflects the way technology is working to make our lives easier, safer, and more enjoyable. But is it really? In some ways, yes: Electronic devices tell us how to reverse our cars, Siri is there to help with questions big and small, and Google intuits what we are really looking for when we’re not quite sure of the spelling.
What’s not to love? I certainly did love it all, until it started going wrong, and it had nothing to do with that Israeli security firm. When I finally got my car started that day, see, I promptly reversed into the wall of the car park. My brain was in automatic mode and my own car was too old to have warning beeps. The very next day I lost the bag that had my phone in it at the airport. When I wanted to call a good friend for some moral support, I had forgotten his phone number. I was frazzled—in part because up until then I was rather unaware of how dependent I’d become on this network of stuff.
How I Busted Out Of My Addictive Technology Loop

More than ever, this Internet of things reflects the way technology is working to make our lives easier, safer, and more enjoyable. But is it really? In some ways, yes: Electronic devices tell us how to reverse our cars, Siri is there to help with questions big and small, and Google intuits what we are really looking for when we’re not quite sure of the spelling.

What’s not to love? I certainly did love it all, until it started going wrong, and it had nothing to do with that Israeli security firm. When I finally got my car started that day, see, I promptly reversed into the wall of the car park. My brain was in automatic mode and my own car was too old to have warning beeps. The very next day I lost the bag that had my phone in it at the airport. When I wanted to call a good friend for some moral support, I had forgotten his phone number. I was frazzled—in part because up until then I was rather unaware of how dependent I’d become on this network of stuff.

How I Busted Out Of My Addictive Technology Loop