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With Nest scooped up by Google for $3.2 billion, one company believes there’s room for another sleek smart thermostat.
Spark wanted to show it could create an open-source Nest-like thermostat using Spark Core, its Arduino-compatible development platform for building Internet-connected hardware. The result isn’t an exact duplicate, but it’s not a bad approximation for a day’s worth of work. For example, instead of a glass and aluminum enclosure, which Nest uses, Spark opted for acrylic and wood for its prototype. 
An open-source, Nest-like thermostat, built in one day

With Nest scooped up by Google for $3.2 billion, one company believes there’s room for another sleek smart thermostat.

Spark wanted to show it could create an open-source Nest-like thermostat using Spark Core, its Arduino-compatible development platform for building Internet-connected hardware. The result isn’t an exact duplicate, but it’s not a bad approximation for a day’s worth of work. For example, instead of a glass and aluminum enclosure, which Nest uses, Spark opted for acrylic and wood for its prototype. 

An open-source, Nest-like thermostat, built in one day

This insanely slippery non-stick coating gets every last bit out of jars. Even glue jars. Watch

LiquiGlide is a super slippery coating that can be applied to all types of surfaces. WhenCo.Exist first broke the news about the invention, Dave Smith, the PhD candidate behind the novel substance, was focused on using LiquiGlide to make ketchup flow from jars like water—so we no longer had to tussle with that bottle of Heinz like a Shake Weight. (His aim was noble: Smith estimated the solution could save more than a million tons of annual food waste in the sauce industry alone.)

Since then, Smith has dropped out of MIT, incorporated LiquiGlide, and built up a team of nearly 20 mechanical engineers and nano-technologists. His company is now negotiating deals with the largest consumer packaged goods companies to bring LiquiGlide to everything from toothpaste and syrup to beer. He’s also exploring how the technology could be applied to a new range of industries, including medical, manufacturing, and even transportation products.

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This Powered Exoskeleton Lets Paraplegics Walk Again 


In February 2002, Michael Gore broke his back in a work accident and lost all function and feeling in his legs. Using the Indego Exoskeleton, a device at the forefront of wearable robotics, Gore can now get up and walk again (see video).
With the Indego, patients with spinal cord injuries or with other motor problems strap their lower bodies into a piece of equipment that looks like leg braces. The Indego, however, uses sophisticated technology that does much more than just provide support. Gyroscopes and accelerators anticipate a patient’s steps by subtle upper body motion—similar to how a Segway works. Then, the Indego moves in concert with the patient’s leg to take a step. The wearer is using their own muscles to do the work, with a little extra help.

This Powered Exoskeleton Lets Paraplegics Walk Again

In February 2002, Michael Gore broke his back in a work accident and lost all function and feeling in his legs. Using the Indego Exoskeleton, a device at the forefront of wearable robotics, Gore can now get up and walk again (see video).

With the Indego, patients with spinal cord injuries or with other motor problems strap their lower bodies into a piece of equipment that looks like leg braces. The Indego, however, uses sophisticated technology that does much more than just provide support. Gyroscopes and accelerators anticipate a patient’s steps by subtle upper body motion—similar to how a Segway works. Then, the Indego moves in concert with the patient’s leg to take a step. The wearer is using their own muscles to do the work, with a little extra help.

 SoulCycle Founders: You Know Your Business Better Than Your Critics Do 


When Julie Rice and Elizabeth Cutler founded the high-end gym chain SoulCycle, they faced an uphill battle. Their friends, for starters, told the cofounders and CEOs that their emphasis on indoor spinning was a dated idea.

"He said, ‘I don’t have the heart to tell you this, but you know spinning is dead,’" laughs Cutler, recalling the conversation.
But Cutler and Rice felt differently. “We were like ‘Well, I think we can still do it. I think we can still reinvent it,’” she says. “‘I think we can still create something we want as the user.’”

SoulCycle Founders: You Know Your Business Better Than Your Critics Do

When Julie Rice and Elizabeth Cutler founded the high-end gym chain SoulCycle, they faced an uphill battle. Their friends, for starters, told the cofounders and CEOs that their emphasis on indoor spinning was a dated idea.

"He said, ‘I don’t have the heart to tell you this, but you know spinning is dead,’" laughs Cutler, recalling the conversation.

But Cutler and Rice felt differently. “We were like ‘Well, I think we can still do it. I think we can still reinvent it,’” she says. “‘I think we can still create something we want as the user.’”

8. Fail well

There should be no stigma attached to failure. If you do not fail often, you are not trying hard enough. At Google, once a product fails to reach its potential, it is axed, but the company pulls from the best of the features. “Failure is actually a badge of honor,” he says. “Failure is the way to be innovative and successful. You can fail with pride.”

Google Reveals Its 9 Principles of Innovation

In this way we get “brain hubs,” places that contribute an outsized portion of the GDP and generate an unreasonable number of patents. This capital-ization has pretty far-reaching effects: the more high-tech, high-powered folks you have in a place, the more similarly gifted people will be attracted to moving there—and all these jobs actually generate more jobs. Moretti says that a high-tech job actually creates something like 10 service sector gigs.

Why Your Friends Shape Your Happiness, Creativity, and Career