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Here’s an interactive map that shows the median income of every neighborhood in the U.S. 
Rich Blocks, Poor Blocks is an interactive map showing the average income for every neighborhood in America. Type in your address, press search, and there you have it: Your city, shaded by income, according to data from an annual survey conducted by the Census Bureau. The greenest blocks—Census blocks, that is, not city blocks—signify the richest areas, typically bringing in an average household income of $100,000 or more a year. The reddest blocks are the poorest, with annual income somewhere around $20,000. All the rest get some shade of red or green, depending where they fall.
Check out the full story here.

Here’s an interactive map that shows the median income of every neighborhood in the U.S. 

Rich Blocks, Poor Blocks is an interactive map showing the average income for every neighborhood in America. Type in your address, press search, and there you have it: Your city, shaded by income, according to data from an annual survey conducted by the Census Bureau. The greenest blocks—Census blocks, that is, not city blocks—signify the richest areas, typically bringing in an average household income of $100,000 or more a year. The reddest blocks are the poorest, with annual income somewhere around $20,000. All the rest get some shade of red or green, depending where they fall.

Check out the full story here.

Ingenious Infographic: U.S. Highways, Mapped Like A Subway System

The graphic language of the London Underground map is so iconic that “[insert any network or process here] visualized as a London Underground map” has become a design cliché. So why are we writing about the latest iteration, a Tube-style map of U.S. interstate highways, created by Cameron Booth? Because, clichéd or not, visualizing this particular system in this way is actually damned useful.

See more of the infographic->

Ingenious Infographic: U.S. Highways, Mapped Like A Subway System

The graphic language of the London Underground map is so iconic that “[insert any network or process here] visualized as a London Underground map” has become a design cliché. So why are we writing about the latest iteration, a Tube-style map of U.S. interstate highways, created by Cameron Booth? Because, clichéd or not, visualizing this particular system in this way is actually damned useful.

See more of the infographic->

The folks at the London-based “ideas agency” Syzygy just sent us this illustration by their creative director, Peter Jaworowski, of the “20 greatest, funniest and most insane internet events from 2011.” Here’s the thing: You have to guess what they are by decoding the visual clues.
 Read more->

The folks at the London-based “ideas agency” Syzygy just sent us this illustration by their creative director, Peter Jaworowski, of the “20 greatest, funniest and most insane internet events from 2011.” Here’s the thing: You have to guess what they are by decoding the visual clues.

Read more->

The 23 Best Infographics We Found In 2011

As infographics go mainstream, infographic designers grow bolder. Some of the most tantalizing projects we came across this past year stretched our understanding of what a data visualization can be: It can be a set of interactive commuter-train maps plotted not according to distance but time. It can be a metaphorical chart of how water flows from the source to the consumer. It can be the spikes and dips of the Dow Jones Industrial Average rendered as notes on a musical scale. Infographics have clearly evolved into something greater than just a way to make raw numbers more enticing. They’re a full-blown art form.

(Source: fastcodesign.com)


The percentage voting for Obama represents the largest age-based disparity ever recorded. It’s worth pausing on that for a second, because voting, contrary to popular opinion, doesn’t tend to change all that much as you age. Political scientists have consistently shown that who you vote for as a young person tends to define your voting patterns for the rest of your life. Thus, some people have concluded that the entire millennial generation has been “lost” to Republicans. (And if you think that they’ll change their minds because of Obama’s first-term struggles, think again: 60% blame his opponents for his inability to get anything done.)

 Infographic Of The Day: The Blessing And Curse Of Being A Millennial

The percentage voting for Obama represents the largest age-based disparity ever recorded. It’s worth pausing on that for a second, because voting, contrary to popular opinion, doesn’t tend to change all that much as you age. Political scientists have consistently shown that who you vote for as a young person tends to define your voting patterns for the rest of your life. Thus, some people have concluded that the entire millennial generation has been “lost” to Republicans. (And if you think that they’ll change their minds because of Obama’s first-term struggles, think again: 60% blame his opponents for his inability to get anything done.)

Infographic Of The Day: The Blessing And Curse Of Being A Millennial