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A New App Will Let You Share Your Leftovers With Strangers
Startups have made it so much easier for peer-to-peer buying and bartering these days. Need a place to stay? Swap houses. Want to fill out your wardrobe? Swap clothing. And coming soon is Leftover Swap, a smartphone app to help you barter or give away your leftovers.
This is either ingenius or cringe-worthy, depending on your penchant for other people’s unfinished meals.
"It’s obviously not for everybody," says Leftover Swap co-founder Dan Newman. “But for as many people who seemingly have a problem with it, there’s people who love the idea."
Read the rest on NPR’s All Tech Considered blog.
(Photo: User Quotable Kidney on Flickr Creative Commons)

npr:

A New App Will Let You Share Your Leftovers With Strangers

Startups have made it so much easier for peer-to-peer buying and bartering these days. Need a place to stay? Swap houses. Want to fill out your wardrobe? Swap clothing. And coming soon is Leftover Swap, a smartphone app to help you barter or give away your leftovers.

This is either ingenius or cringe-worthy, depending on your penchant for other people’s unfinished meals.

"It’s obviously not for everybody," says Leftover Swap co-founder Dan Newman. “But for as many people who seemingly have a problem with it, there’s people who love the idea."

Read the rest on NPR’s All Tech Considered blog.

(Photo: User Quotable Kidney on Flickr Creative Commons)

Feeding The World’s Under-Nourished … With Crickets
An innovative new solution to hunger from a group of students at McGill University, in Montreal would produce and distribute edible insects on an industrial scale.

The idea is to distribute cricket-producing kits to the world’s slums as a way of improving diets, and giving people more income. Families would eat what they needed, while selling the rest for processing into flour, and other products.

Here’s the story.

Feeding The World’s Under-Nourished … With Crickets

An innovative new solution to hunger from a group of students at McGill University, in Montreal would produce and distribute edible insects on an industrial scale.

The idea is to distribute cricket-producing kits to the world’s slums as a way of improving diets, and giving people more income. Families would eat what they needed, while selling the rest for processing into flour, and other products.

Here’s the story.