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"In most any other city in the country at that time, if you tried to put a company together that included a couple of sport-coat-and-tie-wearing yuppies, some pocket-protector, can’t-give-you-a-good-handshake computer nerds, as well as some hippie-freak rock-and-roll poster artists, those three walks of life would not get along and respect one another. When you come to Austin, those three walks of life are intermingled throughout the city. At SXSW, my group of nerds was embraced by the rock-and-roll hippie freaks, and the business suits were welcomed into the community.” —RichardGarriott, founder, Origin Systems; creator, online game Ultima (now creative director, Portalarium; astronaut, Space Adventures)

An extensive oral history of SXSW Interactive, from 1994 - 2014

“I love red; it is the color of life,” the late French fashion legend Christian Dior once said. It’s also the color of blood, the Badge of Courage, rubies, and danger, not to mention Dior’s boldest lipcolor, Rouge Dior #9. To celebrate six decades of the Rouge Dior lipstick collection, the label has revived the classic shade as part of its Fall 2013 wardrobe, along with 32 new shades.

One way to have more energy at work? Eat smarter. If you don’t get enough protein in your diet—as in, you survive on bagels and coffee, like Ms. Hepburn above—then you’re inviting the low-energy grump into your life. As Lifehacker writer Jason Fitzpatrick notes:

A diet comprised mainly of carbohydrates… . is a recipe for a constant cycle of blood-sugar highs, lows, and the accompanying feelings of exhaustion that go with them. If carbohydrates are the kindling of your metabolism, protein is the slow burning old-growth wood that keeps you going.

How to get more? Fitzpatrick recommends eggs, peanut better, and working in some protein powder. 8 unobvious ways to have way more energy at work

One way to have more energy at work? Eat smarter. If you don’t get enough protein in your diet—as in, you survive on bagels and coffee, like Ms. Hepburn above—then you’re inviting the low-energy grump into your life. As Lifehacker writer Jason Fitzpatrick notes:

A diet comprised mainly of carbohydrates… . is a recipe for a constant cycle of blood-sugar highs, lows, and the accompanying feelings of exhaustion that go with them. If carbohydrates are the kindling of your metabolism, protein is the slow burning old-growth wood that keeps you going.

How to get more? Fitzpatrick recommends eggs, peanut better, and working in some protein powder. 8 unobvious ways to have way more energy at work

As far back as the early 2000s, fingerprint sensors were embedded in a slew of devices, from laptops produced by HP and Toshiba to phones made by Nokia and Motorola. But while Apple was able to make fingerprint sensors feel like a fresh idea, its competitors were only capable of making the technology feel superfluous, stale, and unready for market.

How the PC industry failed to best Apple… again

"There is no one to disturb you and it is cool or cold and you come to your work and warm as you write. You read what you have written and, as you always stop when you know what is going to happen next, you go on from there. You write until you come to a place where you still have your juice and know what will happen next and you stop and try to live through until the next day when you hit it again. You have started at six in the morning, say, and may go on until noon or be through before that."
—Ernest Hemingway, who got up insanely early and knew the benefits of a standing desk. 
Productivity lessons from Hemingway

"There is no one to disturb you and it is cool or cold and you come to your work and warm as you write. You read what you have written and, as you always stop when you know what is going to happen next, you go on from there. You write until you come to a place where you still have your juice and know what will happen next and you stop and try to live through until the next day when you hit it again. You have started at six in the morning, say, and may go on until noon or be through before that."

Ernest Hemingway, who got up insanely early and knew the benefits of a standing desk. 

Productivity lessons from Hemingway

I can picture Steve [Jobs] running into the Macintosh design group and saying really excitedly, ‘We’ve got this fantastic concept.’ His idea was that a nontechnical secretary should be able to go into a room alone with a Mac in a box and a letter opener and be doing useful work in one hour.

Our new book, Design Crazy, tells the story of how some of the most iconic Apple designs came about. It’s a great weekend read, and it’s in the iTunes store for $1.99!