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The Fascinating Neuroscience Of Color
Neuroscientist Bevil Conway believes scientists can learn a lot from examining the strategies artists use to clarify color. “The best access we have of what color is and what it does to us is by studying the work of people who have studied it obsessively. Matisse is one of those people,” he says. “I think it’s extremely valuable, and there’s been very limited work treating that corpus as the sort of scientific evidence that it will turn out to be.”
More> Co.Design

The Fascinating Neuroscience Of Color

Neuroscientist Bevil Conway believes scientists can learn a lot from examining the strategies artists use to clarify color. “The best access we have of what color is and what it does to us is by studying the work of people who have studied it obsessively. Matisse is one of those people,” he says. “I think it’s extremely valuable, and there’s been very limited work treating that corpus as the sort of scientific evidence that it will turn out to be.”

More> Co.Design

So even as we kind of hate child prodigies, we remain in awe of their gifts. For a long time, scientists had little insight into the nature of these talents. But over the past several years psychologist Joanne Ruthsatz has assembled what she calls the “largest sample” of prodigies on record—a list more than 30 deep and growing—and what she’s found points to one factor that’s consistently off the charts among prodigies regardless of their area of focus: working memory.

“They all have exceptional memories,” Ruthsatz tells Co.Design. “I think it’s the piece that allows for their abilities.

The One Extraordinary Skill All Prodigies Share

The next wave of fitness trackers will do a lot more than count your steps, mold raw data, and present it all for you in a pretty chart for you to glance at and forget about. If Jawbone Up is any indication, these wearables will use the subtle power of suggestion to help us live healthier lives, too.

Today, Jawbone is rolling out a new, slightly tongue-in-cheek but sleek app to help manage our caffeine intake. It is called Up Coffee.

Its premise is simple enough: You log your coffee, tea, and energy drink consumption in the app, which will tell you where you fall on a spectrum from “Wired” to “Sleep Ready.” If you have a fitness band, it will make correlations, and tell you when it might be wise to stop your intake if you’re hoping to sleep at a reasonable hour that night. “After tracking both caffeine intake and sleep for 10 days, Up Coffee can tell you things like the amount of sleep you lose on average for every 100mg of caffeine you ingest,” the company says.

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"There really are two kinds of food entrepreneurs," says venture capitalist Paul Matteucci, who encourages and connects food-tech upstarts through his not-for-profit, Feeding 10 Billion. “There are the ones that hang around Berkeley or Brooklyn, and build businesses mostly for the end consumer. Then there is a whole different group of highly technical people who are building robotics for the field, sensor-based technology, automated watering systems, new food-packaging technologies, and big-data-related inventory control to reduce waste.” These, he says, are “the people who are going to solve the big problems.”

A raft of entrepreneurs and venture capitalists made their money in tech, and now want to do something with an even longer-lasting impact. Meet the Silicon Valley companies trying to fix our broken food system