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The creators say the lower price comes from designing a custom motor that doesn’t have as much extra lifting power as other standing desks. It’s only designed to lift 225 pounds—enough to hoist your computer and desk gadgets, though maybe don’t put every textbook you own on it. It’s a clean, simple design with no frills, just a smooth tabletop and a small control panel. Considering that I spend my days curled over my desk in a bizarre yoga pose called, “becoming one with the laptop,” I’m on board.

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(via fastcodesign)

Working late on a project? Why staying up all night is the worst thing you can do.
When running up against a deadline, pulling an all-nighter may seem your only option to complete a project, but a recent study published in the Swedish journal, Sleep showed that, rather than boosting productivity, staying up all night is actually harmful to your brain.
The researchers measured blood levels of certain proteins associated with brain injuries such as concussions and found protein levels were 20% higher in those who pulled all-nighters compared to when they got a full night’s rest. Although not as high as protein levels post-concussion, the study proves skimping on sleep can do real brain damage.
Dr. Ermerson Wickwire, Sleep Medicine program director at Howard County Centre for Lung and Sleep Medicine in Columbia, Maryland, and assistant professor at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, says that while many executives have habituated to chronic sleep loss, they are losing out on key productivity benefits of sleep by depriving their brains of a nutrient just as vital as food or water.
Why are all-nighters so harmful?
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[Image: Flickr user amboo who?]

Working late on a project? Why staying up all night is the worst thing you can do.

When running up against a deadline, pulling an all-nighter may seem your only option to complete a project, but a recent study published in the Swedish journal, Sleep showed that, rather than boosting productivity, staying up all night is actually harmful to your brain.

The researchers measured blood levels of certain proteins associated with brain injuries such as concussions and found protein levels were 20% higher in those who pulled all-nighters compared to when they got a full night’s rest. Although not as high as protein levels post-concussion, the study proves skimping on sleep can do real brain damage.

Dr. Ermerson Wickwire, Sleep Medicine program director at Howard County Centre for Lung and Sleep Medicine in Columbia, Maryland, and assistant professor at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, says that while many executives have habituated to chronic sleep loss, they are losing out on key productivity benefits of sleep by depriving their brains of a nutrient just as vital as food or water.

Why are all-nighters so harmful?

Read More>

[Image: Flickr user amboo who?]

For kids in developing world slums, dental hygiene is a real problem. With this cheap gum developed by a team of college students, they might be able to have their candy and clean teeth.

"The thing with gum is that you want it because it’s tasty. The health benefits are almost extra," says one of the gum’s creators, Josh Tycko. "Toothpaste is seen as extra expenditure for long-term dental care that is too far on the horizon to be thinking about when you’re living on a small budget."

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For kids in developing world slums, dental hygiene is a real problem. With this cheap gum developed by a team of college students, they might be able to have their candy and clean teeth.

"The thing with gum is that you want it because it’s tasty. The health benefits are almost extra," says one of the gum’s creators, Josh Tycko. "Toothpaste is seen as extra expenditure for long-term dental care that is too far on the horizon to be thinking about when you’re living on a small budget."

Read More>

I got plugged into the fact that if I focus my efforts on helping other people get sober, then I can stay sober—and that’s why giving people a second chance is so important to me.

Today, Michael Dadashi is the CEO of MHD Enterprises, a multi-million dollar e-waste recycling company based in Austin. But five years ago he was a heroin addict who couldn’t keep a job and nearly lost his life to an overdose—and that was his turning point.

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Read: This Fast-Growing Company Is Giving Former Addicts And Alcoholics A Second Chance

For the first time, scientists have created early-stage embryos using cloned cells from adults.
A study from Advanced Cell Technology published Thursday in the journal Cell Stem Cell highlights how researchers were able to create embryos from the skin cells of two men, ages 35 and 75. Tissue from the embryos featured exact DNA matches with the donors.
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For the first time, scientists have created early-stage embryos using cloned cells from adults.

A study from Advanced Cell Technology published Thursday in the journal Cell Stem Cell highlights how researchers were able to create embryos from the skin cells of two men, ages 35 and 75. Tissue from the embryos featured exact DNA matches with the donors.

Read More>

If You Live Near A Park, You’re More Likely To Be Happy
If you want to be happy, living near a park could be a good idea. More and more research shows a relationship between green space and higher levels of mental health.
The latest comes from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Researchers looked at 2009 survey data that asked 2,500 residents about depression, anxiety, and stress. They next analyzed 229 neighborhoods for vegetation cover. Those places with more trees tended to be happier, and the association was “significant and sizable,” according to a paper discussing the results.
Read More>

If You Live Near A Park, You’re More Likely To Be Happy

If you want to be happy, living near a park could be a good idea. More and more research shows a relationship between green space and higher levels of mental health.

The latest comes from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Researchers looked at 2009 survey data that asked 2,500 residents about depression, anxiety, and stress. They next analyzed 229 neighborhoods for vegetation cover. Those places with more trees tended to be happier, and the association was “significant and sizable,” according to a paper discussing the results.

Read More>