FastCompany Magazine

The official Tumblr of Fast Company.

Daily Fast Feed Roundup
Hello Tumblr! Here’s a quick rundown of what you need to know today: 
Zynga has filed a trademark infringement claim against the creators of Bang With Friends for using “With Friends" in its name. 
The FAA has approved commercial drone flights in U.S. airspace.
Pro-Assad Syrian hackers compromised the social media and email accounts of a number White House employees.
Researchers in Texas successfully hacked into the navigation system of a yacht that was cruising in the Mediterranean. 
A Hong Kong man claims that his Galaxy S4 burnt down his apartment.
A court has ruled that authorities no longer need a warrant to track cellphone location data.
Swiss scientists have created the perfect tech storm, a 3-D-printed, self-assembling drone swarm. 
Have a great day!
—M. Cecelia Bittner and Jessica Hullinger

Daily Fast Feed Roundup

Hello Tumblr! Here’s a quick rundown of what you need to know today: 

Have a great day!

M. Cecelia Bittner and Jessica Hullinger

Daily Fast Feed Roundup
Good morning Tumblr! Here’s a quick rundown of what you need to know today: 
The shut down of an Apple developer center last week may have been triggered by the security researcher who pointed out some of Apple’s bugs and potential cyber weaknesses. 
Word on the street has it that Apple is testing iPads and iPhones with larger screens.
Yahoo just bought back $1.16 billion in shares from hedge fund investor Third Point LLC. 
An encryption flaw in some SIM cards means that roughly 750 million phones can be hacked in a matter of minutes via text message. 
Celebrated statistician and 2013’s most creative person, Nate Silver, is leaving The New York Times for ESPN. 
Here is why you will see many more 3-D printers next year.
Twitter co-founder Biz Stone thinks that Facebook should go premium with a paid ad-free version.
Have a great week!
—M. Cecelia Bittner and Jessica Hullinger

Daily Fast Feed Roundup

Good morning Tumblr! Here’s a quick rundown of what you need to know today: 

Have a great week!

M. Cecelia Bittner and Jessica Hullinger

Makey Makey is a little circuit board that comes with a set of alligator clips. You can attach them to anything even mildly conductive (a body part, a glass of water, alphabet noodles, paper clips, Play Dough, or fruit for example) and use that thing to control your computer as though you were hitting the keyboard or moving the mouse.

Turn a bunch of bananas into a piano. Turn your friends into a synthesizer. Turn a trampoline into a slideshow controller. Turn your hand into a game glove. The possibilities are endless. 

Daily Fast Feed Roundup
Hello Tumblr! Here’s a quick rundown of what you need to know today: 
Michelle Obama and the White House just joined Instagram. We’ll see if they can rock the web as hard as Hillary Clinton did with her awesome Twitter bio. 
Asia’s first 3-D printed fashion show was a big hit. 
An 18-year old Icelandic WikiLeaks volunteer made about $5,000 working as a paid FBI informant.
Here’s a video pitch for Atlantis … a virtual black market for drugs.
The environmental blog Grist created a crowdsourced Google map of America’s natural disasters. 
A new study has found that mobile ads are what’s killing your phone’s battery power.
Yahoo just redesigned its news site, Yahoo News.
Facebook has fixed a bug that let hackers hijack accounts via SMS text message.
A study found that big data offers the travel industry many amazing opportunities for growth but that major brands are not taking advantage of these benefits.
Taco Bell has launched a “Protein Power” menu, which will be loaded with extra meat. Yum?
Have a great day! —M. Cecelia Bittner and Jessica Hullinger

Daily Fast Feed Roundup

Hello Tumblr! Here’s a quick rundown of what you need to know today: 


Have a great day! —M. Cecelia Bittner and Jessica Hullinger

Daily Fast Feed Roundup
Hello Tumblr! Here’s a quick rundown of what you need to know today: 

The Ellen Degeneres Show and Nike are among the most successful brands on Instagram.  
North and South Korean websites suffered outages due to a cyber attack allegedly made by the hacker group Anonymous.
A European official has ruled that Google should be treated like a host, not a publisher. Therefore, it is not obliged to remove content produced by others. 
Barnes & Noble is trying to save money by ceasing in-house production of its Nook readers.
Samsung’s cheap plastic casings may be on the way out. They just linked up with a firm that specializes in carbon fiber. 
Reddit is now hosting a linguistic project that maps the various Arabic languages found throughout the Middle East and Africa.
Have a great day! —M. Cecelia Bittner and Jessica Hullinger

Daily Fast Feed Roundup

Hello Tumblr! Here’s a quick rundown of what you need to know today: 

  • A European official has ruled that Google should be treated like a host, not a publisher. Therefore, it is not obliged to remove content produced by others. 


Have a great day! —M. Cecelia Bittner and Jessica Hullinger

Comedy Hack Day, a 36-hour hackathon where participants from both the comedy and tech communities worked together to create some future funny business, appears to have been a crapload of fun.

The big winner of the event is ShoutRoulette, which connects opinionated users to other people with the exact opposite opinion, allowing them to shout at each other. Each member wins a class at the Upright Citizens Brigade Theatre, and entry into the New York Tech Meetup. Other winners include the McKayla Is Not Impressed Chrome Extension (a meme generator), and Spacebar to Money Shot (um, don’t ask.) Even ScatRoulette wins something: The Chris Gethard Memorial Award, which consists of a hug from the judge that goes on for an exceedingly long period.

Read more->

Co.Create looks at some of the projects showcased at Art Hack Day, from an iPhone-powered jump rope to Kinect Russian Roulette.

The 50 (mostly male) participants hailed from all over the globe, and included the founder of 4Chan, tech-philosopher Kyle McDonald, Star Wars Uncut creator Casey Pugh, and members of open-source organizations like F.A.T. Lab and openframeworks. Fueled by the inevitable coolers of Red Bull, they took advantage of the available equipment, from DVD players and laser cutters to Technics turntables and MakerBot 3-D printers, which by Saturday night’s exhibition was cranking out replicas of the beloved anime character Totoro.

Read all about it->

Co.Create looks at some of the projects showcased at Art Hack Day, from an iPhone-powered jump rope to Kinect Russian Roulette.

The 50 (mostly male) participants hailed from all over the globe, and included the founder of 4Chan, tech-philosopher Kyle McDonald, Star Wars Uncut creator Casey Pugh, and members of open-source organizations like F.A.T. Lab and openframeworks. Fueled by the inevitable coolers of Red Bull, they took advantage of the available equipment, from DVD players and laser cutters to Technics turntables and MakerBot 3-D printers, which by Saturday night’s exhibition was cranking out replicas of the beloved anime character Totoro.

Read all about it->

With more than 600,000 hacking attempts on Facebook every day, one might be forgiven for asking why we’re so willing to share the intimate details of our everyday lives. Apparently, we have absolutely no trouble doing so, if whatever we see there looks good.

From Looks To Buy For by Martin Lindstrom
Uh oh, we are all getting hacked.


Yesterday, Senator Charles Schumer held a press conference in an unusual place: Birch Coffee, a cafe near Madison Square Park in Manhattan.
With the funny choice of venue, the senator was making a point: even your friendly neighborhood barista might just be a malevolent hacker. And he doesn’t even need to know how to write a line of code to do so.
It seems likely that Schumer’s recent concern was piqued by a New York Times article from February 16th, which drew attention to the new vulnerabilities faced by WiFi users. In particular, a free program called Firesheep, which first made waves in October. Firesheep makes hacking your fellow cafe-goer a simple, user-friendly, DIY affair. Firesheep takes advantage of a lack of end-to-end encryption, allowing hackers to grab cookies, the snippets of code that indentify your private information. This, in turn, enables hackers to masquerade as you on sites like Facebook, Twitter, Amazon, or eBay. Over a million people have downloaded the program. (Fast Company covered Firesheep months ago.)
Sites that use HTTPS, rather than HTTP, are safe from this sort of hacking. Banking sites tend to use HTTPS, but other sites like the ones mentioned above do not. The purpose of the Schumer conference was to call on sites like Twitter and Amazon to start beefing up their security, acting more like banks.
So just how easy is Firesheep is use? Even a Senator’s aide can do it! A Schumer staffer hacked into the Twitter account of a nearby colleague. Call it consensual hacking. Anyhow, it impressed reporters, as did Schumer’s talk of the HTTP protocol as “a welcome mat for would-be hackers” and a “one-stop-shop for identity theft.”



Easy solution: Don’t go to Starbucks or any coffee shop. Better yet, never leave your house. Stay at home with all the safe Internet you can have, where you belong.

Uh oh, we are all getting hacked.

Yesterday, Senator Charles Schumer held a press conference in an unusual place: Birch Coffee, a cafe near Madison Square Park in Manhattan.

With the funny choice of venue, the senator was making a point: even your friendly neighborhood barista might just be a malevolent hacker. And he doesn’t even need to know how to write a line of code to do so.

It seems likely that Schumer’s recent concern was piqued by a New York Times article from February 16th, which drew attention to the new vulnerabilities faced by WiFi users. In particular, a free program called Firesheep, which first made waves in October. Firesheep makes hacking your fellow cafe-goer a simple, user-friendly, DIY affair. Firesheep takes advantage of a lack of end-to-end encryption, allowing hackers to grab cookies, the snippets of code that indentify your private information. This, in turn, enables hackers to masquerade as you on sites like Facebook, Twitter, Amazon, or eBay. Over a million people have downloaded the program. (Fast Company covered Firesheep months ago.)

Sites that use HTTPS, rather than HTTP, are safe from this sort of hacking. Banking sites tend to use HTTPS, but other sites like the ones mentioned above do not. The purpose of the Schumer conference was to call on sites like Twitter and Amazon to start beefing up their security, acting more like banks.

So just how easy is Firesheep is use? Even a Senator’s aide can do it! A Schumer staffer hacked into the Twitter account of a nearby colleague. Call it consensual hacking. Anyhow, it impressed reporters, as did Schumer’s talk of the HTTP protocol as “a welcome mat for would-be hackers” and a “one-stop-shop for identity theft.”

Easy solution: Don’t go to Starbucks or any coffee shop. Better yet, never leave your house. Stay at home with all the safe Internet you can have, where you belong.